Bellarmine College Awards

University & Bellarmine College Award Recipients

The University and Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts bestows annual awards recognizing faculty member's teaching and advising, research, scholarship, and creative work in addition to recognizing outstanding service by our faculty and staff.

The President's Fritz B. Burns Distinguisged Teaching Award

This faculty award, established in 1993 and endowed by Loyola Marymount University's devoted benefactor, is bestowed annually on the faculty member whose dedication to teaching, research, and the University community exemplifies academic leadership. The recipient of this honor is nominated by his or her peers and chosen by a faculty committee. Professors from all colleges and schools are eligible for nomination, but the recipient's devotion to "education of the whole person," both in practice and in life, transcends a specific field of study. 

2018-2019 President's Fritz B. Burns Distinguished Teaching Awardee: Katerina Zacharia, Professor of Classics and Archaeology

Daum Professorship Award

Created from a legacy received from Harry M. Daum, Class of 1938, the Daum Professorship is given annually to a tenured professor in the Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts with full rank who has exhibited a record of excellence in teaching and advising, scholarship or creative work, and service and leadership in their department, college, and university. Nominees must demonstrate consistent excellence in all areas of faculty responsibility commensurate with rank.  

2018-2019 Daum Professorship Awardee: Aíne O’Healy, Professor of Italian, Department of Modern Languages & Literatures

Prof. Aíne O’Healy has been a Full Professor since 1998 and has served in a number of leadership roles, including consecutive terms as Chair of Modern Languages and Literatures, director of the European Studies and Humanities Programs, director of the summer in Rome program, and a member of the University’s Rank and Tenure Committee. A dedicated teacher and a prolific scholar and translator, her research has focused on migrations and their representation across a range of media, especially in documentary and feature films. Her proposed Daum project, entitled “Gender, Sexuality, and the Difference that Borders Make,” explores Italian film and media practices vis-à-vis the intersecting questions of sex, gender, race, and transborder mobilities. This interdisciplinary project will contribute to scholarly discourses in a number of fields the humanities.

Daum Mid-Career Faculty Research Award

‌Created from a legacy received from Harry M. Daum, Class of 1938, the Daum Mid-Career Faculty Research Award was inaugurated in 2017 to be given annually to a tenured associate professor in the Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts who has exhibited a record of excellence in teaching and advising, scholarship and/or creative work, and service to the department, college and university. Nominees should demonstrate consistent excellence in all areas of faculty responsibility commensurate with rank. 

2018-2019 Daum Mid-Career Faculty Research Awardee: Nora Murphy, Associate Professor and Associate Chair of Psychology

Prof. Nora Murphy is recognized as an innovative and engaged teacher, productive scholar, and active contributor to the Department, College, and University. She is Associate Editor of the Journal of Nonverbal Behavior. Her Daum mid-career research project will explore the relationship between physical attractiveness and measured intelligence. Building on some of her previously published scholarship, Prof. Murphy will employ a large-scale meta-analysis of the extensive body of relevant prior studies to summarize an overall effect. The anticipated outcome of Prof. Murphy’s Daum project is a major contribution to the field of social psychology.

John R. Popiden Distinguished Service Award

‌The Popiden Distinguished Faculty Service Award was created in memory of Associate Dean and Professor of Theological Studies John Popiden. This award honors a tenured BCLA faculty member who has given outstanding service to the college, university, profession, and the community. Many of our faculty are lauded for their academic scholarship, but too rarely are they recognized for their service efforts which yield numerous positive effects and a stronger campus and community.  

2018-2019 John R. Popiden Distinguished Service Awardee: Elizabeth Drummond, Associate Professor and Chair of History

Prof. Elizabeth Drummond has been actively involved in Core revision, served on the Committee for Mission and Identity, the Academic Planning and Review Committee, and College Council Planning Committee, and co-chaired the Technology-Enhanced Learning Implementation Group and the Provost/Faculty Senate Working Group on Merit and Evaluation. She also co-chaired the Provost Search Committee and served as two terms as Faculty Senate President. Most recently, Prof. Drummond led a reorganization of the History major and minor to include thematic concentrations meant to highlight the problems addressed by historians and strengthen History’s relationships with other BCLA programs that better meet the needs of LMU students, academically and professionally. In their nomination letter, several faculty members noted that Prof. Drummond’s list of service activities and commitments is impressive, but what is especially notable is that her goals reach beyond simple good citizenship; she seeks to build stronger structures and the culture of shared governance at LMU.

Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Staff Award

‌This award has been given annually to recognize a staff member with a well-deserved reputation for sustained excellence and initiative in providing administrative or technical support and service. The recipient consistently approaches responsibilities in ways that demonstrate professionalism, timely follow-through and a dedication to the welfare of faculty, students and staff.

2018-2019 Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Staff Awardees: Isabel Solano Robles, BCLA Advisor and Sarah Burtch, BCLA Advisor

Isabel and Sarah both started as inaugural BCLA advisors in summer 2016, and have worked diligently to develop the highly successful BCLA Advising Center. Deeply committed to helping students achieve their academic goals, Isabel and Sarah each meet individually with at least 15 students each week to assist with a host of academic concerns including: filing paperwork, creating degrees, and navigating curricular requirements. In addition, they have been instrumental in streamlining systems and processes to make the work the Advising Center does more efficient and student friendly. Isabel serves as the point-person for BCLA transfer students. She is the first person to step up to take on additional projects or help the team accomplish a task. Most notably, she consulted on a project with ITS to develop the online degree audit form. As part of her portfolio, Sarah teaches a one-unit course for undeclared students helping them discern a major. She is a superlative professional who delivers a high level of service to students with equal parts insight, practical advice, and personal care.

StudyLA Summer Research Fellowships

StudyLA Summer Fellowships support faculty members to conduct research on Los Angeles that incorporates data from StudyLA’s numerous surveys on quality of life, race relations, civic engagement, institutions, politics, economics, and various other subject areas. 

2018-2019 StudyLA Summer Research Fellows: Ed Park, Professor of Asian and Asian American Studies and Priscilla Levia, Assistant Professor of Chicano/a and Latino/a Studies

Prof. Ed Park’s past scholarship engages migration studies, race relations, urban studies, and economic sociology. His timely StudyLA project examines comparatively urban contexts in light of the changing political, cultural, demographic, and physical shift happening in Silicon Beach. Professor Levia’s research draws upon relational ethnic studies, urban history, and sports history, particularly as they relate to place making and community formation. Her project will investigate the ways in which stadiums in Los Angeles have produced and sustained racial meanings that shape ideas about the city and belonging.