Calendar of Events

 

Yoga Studies Events at Loyola Marymount University Spring 2014 

 

Work as Worship: Art Therapy, Meditation, and Karma Yoga
Art Therapy Studio (University Hall 2517) Loyola Marymount University. Wednesday October 29, 2014 from 12:00 - 1:00 p.m.

What if our work in the world felt like worship? How does meditation training support clinical training and why is it important to include contemplative practice in the curriculum sequence? How does the privilege to work as a therapist in a therapeutic relationship inspire  I/Thou encounters? What lessons from Karma Yoga and other socially engaged practices are relevant for the therapist to consider? These questions will be addressed and presented by Dr. Franklin within the context of a contemplative model of training to become an art therapist and counselor.

Michael A. Franklin, PhD, ATR-BC, is the coordinator of the Transpersonal Art Therapy program and the Naropa Community Art Studio (NCAS) at Naropa University in Boulder Colorado. Prior to Naropa, he practiced as a clinician and directed the Art Therapy programs at the College of St. Teresa and Bowling Green State University. Michael is an international lecturer and accomplished author. His research addresses art as contemplative practice encompassing meditation, social engagement/karma-yoga and art-based research. For more information about Michael Franklin: www.artisyoga.com 

Interested participants must RSVP with Lori Gloyd, administrative coordinator of the MFTH / Art Therapy program (Lori.Gloyd@LMU.edu) to reserve their seat. 


The Darshan of the Imagination: Adoring the Collaborative Emergent Through Clay
Art Therapy Studio (University Hall 2517) Loyola Marymount University. Wednesday October 29, 2014 from 7:00 - 9:30 p.m.

From earth, to artistic collaboration, to fire, to stone, to independent object; clay is a material that easily teaches about change. As we will explore, when clay is formed it transforms into patiently waiting imaginal narratives composed of contexts, emotions, and unique scenes. When listened to and followed, these emerging images inspire reverent seeing reminiscent of the Darshan experience. This workshop explores these themes by materializing through clay, the I/Thou textures of the therapeutic relationship. During this 2.5-hour experience we will recreate a client-therapist relationship and discover the waiting potential of Imaginal Darshan.

Michael A. Franklin, PhD, ATR-BC, is the coordinator of the Transpersonal Art Therapy program and the Naropa Community Art Studio (NCAS) at Naropa University in Boulder Colorado. Prior to Naropa, he practiced as a clinician and directed the Art Therapy programs at the College of St. Teresa and Bowling Green State University. Michael is an international lecturer and accomplished author. His research addresses art as contemplative practice encompassing meditation, social engagement/karma-yoga and art-based research. For more information about Michael Franklin: www.artisyoga.com 

Interested participants must RSVP with Lori Gloyd, administrative coordinator of the MFTH / Art Therapy program (Lori.Gloyd@LMU.edu) to reserve their seat. 


Theological Studies Colloquium featuring Chris Chapple, Daniel Smith-Christopher and Chuck Hamilton
Theological Studies Village, UHall 3000, Loyola Marymount University. Thursday October 30, 2014 from 3:15 - 4:30 p.m.

This colloquium presentation will focus on a just-published festschrift edited by Dr. Christopher Chapple titled "Antonio T. deNicolas: Poet of Eternal Return."

Dr. Chapple will introduce the key themes of the book: philosophy, musicology, theories of education, and comparative literary studies.  Professor Daniel Smith-Christopher will summarize and respond to an essay about the pervasiveness of "administration" in contemporary society.  Graduate student Chuck Hamilton will summarize and respond to a chapter on the Bhagavad Gita by LMU alum Dr. Geoff Ashton (PhD Hawaii), assistant professor of philosophy at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs.


LMU Library “Pub Night” with Professor Brian Treanor
Von der Ahe Suite, William H. Hannon Library, Loyola Marymount University Library. Tuesday November 4, 2014 at 5:30 p.m.

Join Professor Treanor for an evening of discussion on his new book, Emplotting Virtue: A Narrative Approach to Environmental Virtue Ethics. Basic arguments include: that we cannot understand environmental ethics without understanding the kinds of persons we ought to be in order to live well in the environment, and that we cannot fully understand the sorts of persons we hope to be without understanding the narratives that make up our identities. Before we can effectively act to "save the world," we need to have some understanding of how we are and who we hope to become; we cannot understand either of those without understanding where we come from, articulated in the various stories in which we find ourselves caught up.


Ahimsa Center International Conference: Care, Compassion and Mindfulness
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. November 7-9, 2014

Care, Compassion and Mindfulness is the theme of the 6th biannual conference on nonviolence hosted by the Ahimsa Center at Cal Poly Pomona in suburban Los Angeles. This conference will draw upon scientific research and practice-based insights from a variety of disciplines and professions to further our understanding of the ways in which we can cultivate care, compassion and mindfulness in our individual selves, in our families and communities, and in world at large. The cultivation of care, compassion and mindfulness calls for a radical transformation in how we relate to each other as human beings, and how we relate to other beings and to nature; it calls for rethinking our personal lives, work lives and civic lives.

Conference details including the schedule, speaker biographies, presentation abstracts, and registration are available via the following link:  http://www.csupomona.edu/~ahimsacenter/conference/conference_14.shtml


Yoga and Ecology: From Eco-Apartheid and Separation to Earth Democracy and Unity
University Hall, Loyola Marymount University. November 9, 2014 from 10:00am - 3:00pm

Vandana Shiva, renowned philosopher, physicist, author, and environmental activist, will discuss the common principles shared by ecology and Yoga. Dominant sciences of exploitation, of the earth and our bodies, are shaped by fragmentation and separation, and undermine the health of the planet and people. This talk will illuminate the connection between Yoga and ecology, which are both based on rejuvenation, unity, and non-separation.

Following the lecture (10:00am - 12:00pm), attendees are invited for lunch and a service learning opportunity in the LMU organic garden. The event will conclude at 3 p.m.

Vandana Shiva is the founder and director of Navdanya Research Foundation for Science, Technology, and Ecology. She is author of numerous books including, “Soil Not Oil: Environmental Justice in an Age of Climate Crisis”; “Stolen Harvest: The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply”; “Earth Democracy: Justice, Sustainability, and Peace”; and “Staying Alive: Women, Ecology, and Development”.

Participation in the event costs $45, please select the following link to register: http://cal.lmu.edu/event/workshop_yoga_and_ecology_from_eco-apartheid_and_separation_to_earth_democracy_and_unity_with_dr_vandana_shiva#.VD_p197nky4


LMU Graduate Open House
University Hall 1840, Loyola Marymount University. December 13, 2014 from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Students attending the Graduate Open House will have the opportunity to meet with program directors and faculty, take a campus tour, and learn about the financial aid and admission process.

10:00 a.m. - Arrival and check-in. There will be a meet & greet held in the Roski dining room. Refreshments will be served.
10:30 a.m. - Opening remarks by Dean Shane Martin.
10:45 a.m. - Yoga Info Session: Program director Dr. Christopher Chapple will meet with interested graduate prospects.
12:00 p.m. - Campus tour for those interested.

Registration is available at: http://graduate.lmu.edu/rsvpLMU. Please contact Fred Puza (fpuza@lmu.edu) for more information.


Devotions of Attachment and Detachment: the Myriad Divinities of Jainism
Theological Studies Village, University Hall 3000, Loyola Marymount University. Wednesday, November 19, 2014 at 8:00pm

The Tirthankara (or Jina) is at the centre of Jain ritual and devotional life. In his liberated state, he is entirely devoid of raga (attachment) and dvesa (aversion) and is therefore completely disengaged from the world.  He responds to no prayers or petitions, and dispenses no saving grace; transactionally he is nonexistent.  Nevertheless, he remains a central focus of much heart-felt devotion.  The Jina – though central – is not the sole focus of Jain devotion. A great many other divinities share the devotional landscape, often presiding over specific domains of need. Drawing upon textual sources as well as upon phenomenological-anthropological research, we will discuss the nature of Jina devotion, as well as devotion to more worldly-focused divinities within the Jaina tradition.

Dr. Kamini Gogri is the Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Research Associate at the Buddihist Center and Coordinator for the Jainology, Indian Aesthetics and Communal Harmony Courses at the University of Mumbai.