Summer 2016 Course Descriptions

SUMMER SESSION I

Course Title:  Paul the Apostle

Course Number: THST 6016

Section Times/Days: M/W 4-7

Instructor: Dr. Jeffrey S. Siker

Course Description/Principal Topics:

In this course we explore the person, ministry, and message of the apostle Paul from historical, literary, social, and theological perspectives, with attention to our own interpretive contexts as well.  The principal topics of the course include:

  • the various worlds that shaped Paul's context (social, historical, religious)
  • the content and contexts of the letters in the New Testament written by Paul, as well as to the debate over letters written in Paul's name
  • the depiction of Paul in the Acts of the Apostles
  • the presentation of Paul in non-canonical writings after the NT
  • the significance of Paul's letters for the development of Christianity
  • modern interpretation and discussion of Paul in relation to various ethical and theological debates (sexuality, women in the church, church and politics, et al)
  • the place of Paul's writings in current debates about Jewish/Christian relations
  • critical understanding of developments in scholarship about Paul

Student Learning Outcomes:

1) Students will know the content of Paul's letters and the contexts that shaped them.

2) Students will be able to engage in critical exegesis and evaluation of Paul's letters and the theological debates about these letters both in ancient and modern contexts.

3) Students will value the significance of Paul in the shaping of the Christian tradition and in the ongoing debates about Christian identity.

Prerequisites/Recommended Background:

preferable for students to have had THST 600 (NT Theology) or 601 (OT Theology)

Required Texts:

  • A Bible (modern translation)
  • M.J. Gorman, Apostle of the Crucified Lord: A Theological Introduction to Paul and His Letters.  Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004.
  • James Dunn, The Theology of Paul the Apostle.  Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2006.
  • V.P. Furnish, The Moral Teaching of Paul: Selected Issues.  3rd edition.  Nashville: Abingdon, 2009.

Course Work/Expectations:

  • two exegetical papers (5-7 pages each)
  • midterm exam
  • final paper (15-20 pages)
  • seminar participation

 

 

Course Title: Introduction to Systematic Theology

Course Number: THST 6030

Sections Times/Days: 4.00-7.00PM; Orange County

Instructor: Susan Abraham

Course Description/Principal Topics:

Systematic theology deals with the contemporary meaning of Christian doctrines and their interrelatedness. Therefore, systematic theology investigates Christian faith in its entirety. Since this is the case, the structure of this class is threefold: (1) an initial investigation of the contemporary situation that forms the context of both theological inquiry and pastoral ministry, (2) a survey of basic Christian doctrines (e.g. faith and revelation, God, Christology, ecclesiology, sacramental theology), and (3) the course requires students to do research in depth into a particular theological issue having to do with Christian doctrine.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Students who complete this course successfully will have a familiarity with the history of Christian doctrine and contemporary theological debates about Christian doctrine. In addition, the course aims to assist students in developing skills in the following areas:
    • critical reading and expository writing
    • researching and organizing essays in theological studies
    • engaging contemporary ministry using theological reflection.

Prerequisites/Recommended Background:

  • Adequate reading and analytical skills beyond college level English, ability to appreciate complex theological and philosophical discussions and think thematically, beyond college level.

Required Texts:

  • Francis Schüssler Fiorenza and John P. Galvin editors, Systematic Theology: Roman Catholic Perspectives Vol. 1 and 2
  • Elizabeth Johnson, The Quest for the Living God
  • Various PDF materials (available online)

Course Work/Expectations:

1.Attendance of all lectures, participation in all discussions

2.Completion of all assigned readings prior to the class discussions

3.Short papers on the readings

4.A research paper (20-25 pages) on a specific topic in systematic theology

 

 

Course Title: Buddhism

Course Number/Section: THST 6084.1

Times/Days:  MW 4:00-7:00

Instructor: 

TBD

Course Description/Principal Topics:

TBD

Student Learning Outcomes:

TBD

Prerequisites/Recommended Background:

TBD

Required Texts:

TBD

Course Work/Expectations:

TBD

 

 

Course Title: Desert Spirituality

Course Number/Section:   THST 6998.1

Times/Days:  TR 4:00-7:00

Instructor:  Douglas Chrisite

Course Description/Principal Topics:

TBD

Contact professor:  Douglas.Christie@lmu.edu

Student Learning Outcomes:

TBD

Prerequisites/Recommended Background:

TBD

Required Texts:

TBD

Course Work/Expectations:

TBD

 

 

SUMMER SESSION II

 

Course Title: Jainism

Course Number/Section:   THST 6087.1

Times/Days:  MW 4:00-7:00

Instructor:  Christopher Chapple

Course Description/Principal Topics:

TBD

Contact professor:  Christopher.Chapple@lmu.edu

Student Learning Outcomes:

TBD

Prerequisites/Recommended Background:

TBD

Required Texts:

TBD

Course Work/Expectations:

TBD

 

 

Title:  Migration and the Border: Context, Theology, and Pastoral Responses

Course Number:  THST 6998-01

Section Times/Days:  Wednesdays, 6/29, 7/6, 7/20, 4-7 pm (online work, trip on 7/11-14)

Instructor:  Dr. Brett C. Hoover

Course Description: 

In this four week, hybrid, engaged learning experience, graduate students in theology and pastoral theology will study and construct a theological response to immigration and the struggles of contemporary immigrants.  Students will begin by studying the context of immigration today and then examine Christian theologies of migration from different parts of the world.  The course will culminate with a one-week visit to the U.S.-Mexico border, observing and discussing the institutions of border control and of pastoral care for immigrants on both sides of the border. 

Learning Outcomes:

As a result of this course, students will be able to:

  • make use of pastoral theological methodologies to reflect on the phenomenon of migration and life at the border;
  • articulate reasons rooted in sociological research as to why people migrate to the United States and what challenges they face;
  • understand several theologies of migration and critically evaluate them as a Christian response to the global phenomenon of migration;
  • construct their own theology of migration addressing their own family or community’s experience or that of people whom they accompany in ministry;
  • develop a practical response to migration in terms of public theology, activism, or ministerial planning.

Pre-requisites: 

None.

Required Texts:

  • Daniel Groody and Gioacchino Campese, eds., A Promised Land, A Perilous Journey (Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 2008).
  • Kristin Heyer, Kinship Across Borders: A Christian Ethic of Immigration (Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press, 2012).
  • Other articles as assigned.

Course Work:

Expectations for this class include keeping a theological journal, participation in a weeklong class trip to both sides of the San Diego-Tijuana border, an oral presentation to other students, and a final integrating research paper.

 

 

Course Title: Special Studies

Course Number/Section:   THST 6998.2

Times/Days:  MW 4:00-7:00

Instructor:  Roberto Dell’Oro

Course Description/Principal Topics:

TBD

Contact professor:  Roberto.Dell’Oro@lmu.edu

Student Learning Outcomes:

TBD

Prerequisites/Recommended Background:

TBD

Required Texts:

TBD

Course Work/Expectations:

TBD