Spring 2021 Course Descriptions

Select a course title below to view the description.

  • SPRING 2021

    FOUNDATIONS OF OLD TESTAMENT THEOLOGY: An ONLINE Graduate Course.

    THST 6000.01 & THST 6000.02

    LECTURES CAN BE VIEWED ON STUDENTS’ OWN WEEKLY SCHEDULE, but there are REQUIRED WEEKLY ZOOM DISCUSSION Sessions.

    ZOOM TIMES: THST 6000.01 (Campus) TUESDAY 4:30 ZOOM DISCUSSION THST 6000.02 (Off site) MONDAY 4:30 ZOOM DISCUSSION

    INSTRUCTOR: Prof. Daniel L. Smith-Christopher

    The Graduate Seminar on Old Testament Theology is a survey of the Old Testament with particular attention to contemporary issues in Biblical Theology. The Seminar schedule presumes that the students maintain a rigorous reading schedule so that conversation in the course is facilitated.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Students will:
    (1)Have a basic orientation to all the books of the Old Testament.

    (2)Have a basic grasp of essential dates of Old Testament History, and the importance of those events for the study of the Bible.

    (3)Have a basic understanding of the different genres of Old Testament Literature, such as Poetry, Wisdom, Prophetic Texts, Law, Story.

    (4) Have a basic understanding of critical approaches to the study of the Bible. (5) Have a basic introduction to contemporary theological issues in relation to OT thought.

    NO PREREQUISITES for this course.

    Required Texts:
    (1) John J. Collins, Introduction to the Hebrew Bible (Third Edition)

    (2) Daniel L. Smith-Christopher, Jonah, Jesus, and Other Good Coyotes

    (3) John Rogerson, A Theology of the Old Testament (2011)

  • SEMESTER: Spring 2021

    COURSE TITLE: Introduction to Systematic Theology

    COURSE NUMBER/SECTION: THST 6030.01

    TIMES/DAYS: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 pm.

    INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Nancy Pineda-Madrid

    COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS
    This course serves as an introduction to systematic theology, its foundational issues and enduring questions. The course will give each student the opportunity to consider how theological discourse reflects and enriches the faith experience of Christian believers, and to consider some of the diverse ways that the experience of Christian faith has been understood. It will briefly survey several enduring theological themes and their attendant questions (i.e., God/Trinity, Creation, Theological Anthropology, Christology, Ecclesiology, etc.). It will attend to the methodological choices made by theologians in their constructive endeavors (i.e., relation of faith and culture; authority of theological sources; interpretation of the Bible; use of tradition; etc.).

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
    By the end of this course, a successfully engaged student will . . .
    (1) have a working vocabulary of the theological categories and terms used in the construction of Systematic Theology
    (2) be able to identify some of the ways in which theologians have approached the enduring questions of Christian theology
    (3) be more clear and confident about your own theological commitments

    PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND
    No prerequisites required. This course is appropriate for students taking their first graduate course in theology.

    REQUIRED TEXTS
    * Fiorenza, Francis Schüssler and John P. Galvin, Eds. Systematic Theology: Roman Catholic Perspectives. Second Edition (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2011) ISBN # 978-0-8006-6291-2
    * Additional required readings will be available through the course’s Brightspace Canvas Site.

    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS
    5 Short Essays (65%)
    Take home written Final Exam (25 %)
    Contribution to Class Discussions and Class Exercises (10%)

  • COURSE TITLE: Liturgical Theology: History and Interpretation

    COURSE NUMBER/SECTION: THST 6040.01

    TIMES/DAYS: W 7:15-9:45pm

    INSTRUCTOR: Layla Karst

    COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS

    “Good liturgy leads us to the edge of chaos,
    and out of that experience will come a theology different from any previous theology.”

    -Urban Holmes, “Theology and Religious Renewal,” 1980

    This course will engage the dynamic relationship between praying and believing that constitutes the field of liturgical theology. It will introduce students to key texts, themes, and issues in theological reflection on and from Christian liturgical practice. Students will learn to use historical, theological, and practical approaches to explore the rituals, symbols, texts, and performance of the Christian liturgy. We will also engage the Christian liturgies as theological sources and practices through which the church does theology and consider how our liturgies shape, express, and even critique Christian theology and practice.

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

    Through successfully completing this course, students will (1) gain a foundational theological vocabulary and familiarity in liturgical theology, (2) become acquainted with the theological methods and discourses that take liturgical practice as both an object and a source for Christian theology, (3) reflect both theologically and critically on lived liturgical practice, and (4) learn to articulate the dynamic relationship between praying and believing.

    PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND

    None.

    REQUIRED TEXTS

    Leonardo Boff, Sacraments of Life, Life of the Sacraments. Washington, DC: The Pastoral Press, 1987.

    Marie-Louis Chauvet, The Sacraments: The Word of God at the Mercy of the Body. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2001.

    *Maxwell Johnson. Praying and Believing in Early Christianity. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2013.

    *Ricky Manalo, The Liturgy of Life. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2014.

    Additional readings will be available on Brightspace.
    *These titles are available electronically via LMU’s Hannon Library.

    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS

    Careful preparation of the course readings is expected. Assignments include short weekly responses, two substantive response papers that will be presented to the class, a written midterm exam, and a final research project.

  • SEMESTER: Spring 2021

    COURSE TITLE: Faith and Culture in Pastoral Ministry

    COURSE NUMBER/SECTION: THST 6043-01

    TIMES/DAYS: M 7:20-9:50pm

    INSTRUCTOR: Allan Figueroa Deck, SJ, Ph.D., STD

    COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS:

    This online, graduate seminar course explores the sources of pastoral ministry and theology in the faith and human experience of Southern California’s diverse cultures. The analysis is grounded in (1) social scientific approaches to culture, (2) theological approaches, both constructive and critical, to the understanding of faith and culture with emphasis on the teachings of Vatican II and recent popes, especially Pope Francis, (3) explorations in interculturality and intercultural competence. The course seeks to develop a critical awareness about faith and culture(s) and how they function and interact in dynamic pastoral contexts in times of epochal change.

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:

    Students will (1) articulate multiple understandings of faith and culture and how they function grounded in Sacred Scripture and the church’s understanding of its identity and mission to evangelize, (2) critically interpret different historical and contemporary theologies of culture, (3) create their own theology of culture, (4) explore and respond to concrete situations of immigrant adaptation in parishes and other pastoral ministries, apostolic movements, schools or social ministries, (5) gain knowledge and insight regarding the practical importance of liturgy, popular religion, prayer, music and art in the transmission of faith through culture in the Catholic and Christian traditions.

    PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND

    Background in undergraduate theology, in the foundations of Pastoral/Practical Theology, and with personal experience in pastoral ministry

    REQUIRED TEXTS:

    Gerald A. Arbuckle, Earthing the Gospel: A Pastoral Handbook for Inculturation, (Eugene, OR: Wipf and Stock Publishers, 2001).

    Pontifical Council for the New Evangelization, Directory for Catechesis, (Washington, DC: USCCB), 2020.

    Pope Francis, Fratelli Tutti: Encyclical Letter on Fraternity and Social Friendship, (Vatican City, 2020).

    Selected articles, chapters and images available on Brightspace or other internet source.


    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS:

    The student will be evaluated in terms of (1) PARTICIPATION which includes attendance in regular online sessions, thoroughly reading assigned books, articles or other media sources, plus participation in small group sessions before and/or after class sessions; (2) An initial WHAT IS CULTUE DRAFT, (3) A CLASS PRESENTATION based on a reading and/or other media source; (4) A RESPONSE TO ANOTHER STUDENT’S CLASS PRESENTATION; (5) A MIDTERM TAKE HOME EXAM; (6) FINAL INCULTURATION PORTFOLIO (9-11 pages).

  • SEMESTER: Spring 2021

    COURSE TITLE: Foundations of Theological Ethics

    COURSE NUMBER/SECTION: THST 6060 01

    TIMES/DAYS: T 7:20-10:10pm

    INSTRUCTOR: Grace Y. Kao

     

    COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS:

    This course provides a systematic introduction to the field of Christian theological ethics. We will read diverse selections from classical and contemporary Christian thinkers (both Catholic and Protestant) as we engage two key methodological questions: (1) how should Christians draw upon the sources of wisdom in Christian theology for moral guidance; and (2) what general approach to ethics should they take (i.e., one that is deontological, teleological, aretological, liberationist and explicitly contextualist—or some combination of the above)? In the second half of the course, we will move from normative ethical theory to applied ethics in our critical assessment of selected topics (viz., war and peace, economics, the environment, and bioethics). Students will also be pressed to consider the distinctiveness of Christian ethics from other (secular) philosophical traditions of moral inquiry as well as areas of overlap they may share with these other accounts.

     

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:

     By the end of this course, students should be able to

    1. describe the main sources of Christian ethical reflection and the ways they interact with one another
    2. compare and contrast the major approaches in Christian ethics
    3. outline and evaluate the diversity of positions Christians have historically taken—and continue to take—on some perennial moral questions and issues
    4. analyze selected case-studies about contemporary moral problems while reaching and then defending their own normative judgments about them

     

    PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND: for MA in Theology/Pastoral Theology students 

     

    REQUIRED TEXTS 

    1. Howard Thurman, Jesus and the Disinherited, reprint ed. (Beacon Press, 1996)
    2. David L. Clough and Brian Stiltner, Faith and Force: A Christian Debate about War (Georgetown UP, 2007)
    3. William T. Cavanaugh, Being Consumed: Economics and Christian Desire (Eerdmans, 2008)
    4. Charlie Camosy, For Love of Animals: Christian Ethics, Consistent Action (Franciscan Media, 2013)
    5. Margaret Farley, Changing the Questions: Explorations in Christian Ethics (Orbis, 2015)       

     *This list is subject to change; many other readings & videos will be made available on Brightspace

     

    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS:

    Weekly attendance via Zoom and active participation | weekly reading | weekly optional crossword puzzles | regular asynchronous discussion on Brightspace or Flipgrid | one office hour appointment | two take-home midterm exams | two short papers and an option to rewrite one paper

  • SPRING 2021

    FOUNDATIONS OF THEOLOGICAL ETHICS: A COMPARATIVE RELIGIOUS ANALYSIS
    BIOE 6600 01/THST 6060-02
    M 7:15 – 9:45pm

    DR. NICHOLAS R. BROWN nbrown15@lmu.edu
    tel: 310-338-1663

    THE COURSE

    In a 2012 article entitled “In Defense of Irreligious Bioethics” published in The American Journal of Bioethics Timothy Murphy writes, “The task of bioethics can be understood, in a sense, as enlarging the prospect for society’s informed consent about its choices, by showing what various religious experiences, creeds and commitments mean in relation to other options. To enjoy the benefits that flow from adversarial engagement, the most valuable approach to religion is to repudiate in all its manifestations the idea that there is a transcendent reality to which the immanent world is beholden.” (8) Murphy’s negative appraisal of religion gives voice to a common if not a prevailing question within the field of bioethics, namely to what extent (if at all) is its project philosophically, conceptually and normatively compatible with the study and practice of religion? The purpose of this course is to engage this question further and sketch out some preliminary answers. Toward that end, it is structured as follows: In the first part of the course, we will take up a meta-ethical analysis of different approaches to religious ethical inquiry and identify what unique metaphysical and normative contributions they offer. As part of this analysis, we will also explore the different historical and intellectual forces that have suppressed religious perspectives within the evolution bioethics and relegated it to the periphery. Next, we will examine, compare, and contrast how bioethics is framed within the context of three different formative religious traditions – Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Lastly, we will survey how each of these traditions evaluates significant bioethical questions surrounding issues at the beginning of life, end of life, organ transplantation and genetic medicine.

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

    Upon completion of the course students should master the following competencies, as should be demonstrated in the in class article and précises presentations, class participation and discussion, and in the research paper:

    • Systematic analysis of the nature of bioethics in Judaism, Christianity or Islam, (b) applied

      analysis, and (c) comparative analysis.

    • The ability to critically reflect upon the nature of bioethics in Judaism, Christianity, or Islam

      and question representations of these religions in bioethical discussions in general and in

      bioethical literature in particular.

    • The capability to succinctly and convincingly formulate arguments about applied bioethics in

      Judaism, Christianity or Islam.

    • The capacity to critically compare and explain bioethical attitudes in different religions.

     

    PREREQUISITES

     Undergraduate degree

    REQUIRED TEXTS

    All assigned course texts are accessible via the course Brightspace page.

  • COURSE TITLE: THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF SPIRITUAL DIRECTION

    COURSE NUMBER/SECTION: THST 6051.1
    TIMES/DAYS: Mondays 7:20-9:50 pm
    INSTRUCTOR: Fr. Jim Clarke Ph.D.

     

    COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS
    This course will study the theory of spiritual direction and offer the student the opportunity to practice the art of spiritual direction with directees. Principal topics covered will include: contemplative listening, discernment, Christian disciplines, spiritual growth and development, images of God and necessary skills for spiritual direction.

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

    Students Will:

    • Read about contemporary models of spiritual direction.

    • Experience the process of spiritual direction.

    • Identify desired qualities in directors, directees, and spiritual direction relationships.

    • Explore contemplative listening.

    • Develop some skills in assisting others to notice and talk about their ongoing experience with God.

    • Explore how gender, racial, generational and cultural qualities can influence the practice of spiritual direction.

    • Describe how other Christian disciplines and particularly the directee's prayer life become part of spiritual

      direction conversations.

    • Analyze elements that influence discernment in the director, directee and spiritual direction meetings.

    • Reflect upon evaluating spiritual experiences.

    • Become acquainted with possible fruits and potential hazards resulting from participation in the Christian discipline of spiritual direction.

    • Identify appropriate accountability and supervision relationships for directors.

    • Discern whether they feel called to the ministry of spiritual direction. Do you desire to continue studying and become involved as a director? Is spiritual direction a discipline you feel called to pursue as a directee?

    PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND

    THST Graduate Students Only

     

    REQUIRED TEXTS

    Reader (purchased on the first night of class)
    Janet Ruffing, Spiritual Direction: Beyond the Beginnings
    Wilkie Au, The Enduring Heart: Spirituality for the Long Haul
    William P. Young, The Shack: Where Tragedy Confronts Eternity
    William Barry and Willian Connolly, The Practice of Spiritual Direction (Revised)
    Joan Borysenko and Gordon Dveirin, Your Soul’s Compass: What is Spiritual Guidance

    Jeannette Bakke, Holy Invitations: Exploring Spiritual Direction
    Margaret Guenther, Holy Listening: The Art of Spiritual Direction

    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS

    Class attendance and active class participation

    Weekly 1 page reflection paper

    Course project and final paper

  • SEMESTER: Spring 2021
    COURSE TITLE: SUPERVISED PASTORAL FIELD EDUCATION

    COURSE NUMBER/SECTION: THST 6078.01

    TIMES/DAYS: Wednesday 4:10 to 7;00 p.m. Class will meet synchronously on Zoom and asynchronously on line (Hybrid)

    INSTRUCTOR: Michael P. Horan, Ph. D.

    COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS:
    Students reflect in an integrated way on required supervised field education experiences, either at their current ministry, or in some other approved ministry environment. The course aims to fortify ministry skills, especially in oral communication, listening skills, and leadership for prayer and preaching.

    LEARNING OUTCOMES:
    Students who successfully engage in and complete this course will...

    Identify and elaborate the connections between their experiences of ministry and the theology they are learning; articulate key contextual factors—environmental, cultural, psychological, spiritual and ecclesial—that impact particular ministry sites and pastoral challenges; facilitate work and learning groups in the context of ministry; display adequate competency in prayer leadership and oral presentation (preaching) skills; demonstrate improvement in the interpersonal and leadership skills necessary for effective ministry

    PRE-REQUISITES:                                                                                                                                Completion of THST 6090 (Graduate Pro-Seminar), THST 6070 (Foundations of Pastoral Theology), and THST 6000 or 6010 (Foundations of New or Old Testament theology). Students must at least be co-enrolled in THST 6060 (Ethics) or 6030 (Systematic Theology). We will bring the curriculum from these courses to bear on our reflection and case studies.

    REQUIRED TEXTS:
    Anthony J. Gittins, Living Mission Interculturally: Faith, Culture, and the Renewal of Praxis (Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2015).
    Jeffrey H. Mahan, Barbara B. Troxell, and Carol J. Allen, Shared Wisdom: A Guide to Case Study Reflection in Ministry (Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1993).
    Mary Angela Shaughnessy Ministry and the Law (Mahwah NJ: Paulist Press, 1998).
    Other readings available on Brightspace.

    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS:                                                                                                                  Ministry placement, full active participation in seminar, completion of reading analysis papers (5) and take- home mid-term and final exams

  • SEMESTER: Spring 2021
    COURSE TITLE: Research and Writing Seminar
    COURSE NUMBER/SECTION: THST6093.01
    TIMES/DAYS: Wednesdays 7:20-9:50 pm (& meetings scheduled individually)

    INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Nancy Pineda-Madrid

     

    COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS

    This is the required research and writing seminar for MA in Theology students. It is the second course of a two course year-long sequence. The first course is the Comprehensive Exam Seminar.

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
    By the end of this course, a successfully engaged student will . . .
    (1) have acquired the skills needed to conceptualize and complete a larger research project

    (2) be able to evaluate sources for quality and to employ sources both appreciatively and critically       

    (3) have learned how to use multiple drafts to write a larger research project                                             

    (4) have demonstrated clear, scholarly, and reflective writing

    PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND                                                                                    THST 6092: Comprehensive Exam Seminar

    REQUIRED TEXTS
    - Kate L. Turabian, Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations: Chicago Style for Students & Researchers, 9th ed. (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2018) ISBN # 978-0-226-43057-7

    - [Highly Recommended] Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein, They Say, I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing. (New York: W.W. Norton & Co, 2018) ISBN # 978-0-393-63167-8

    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS
    Revised Proposal from the Comprehensive Exam Seminar (10%)

    First Draft: 20 Pages/First Half (15%)
    First Complete Draft (15%)
    Second Complete Draft (20%)
    Oral Project Presentation (10%)
    Final Draft (30%)

  • SPRING 2021

    COURSE TITLE: BIOETHICS AT THE BEGINNING OF LIFE

    COURSE NUMBER: BIOE 6100 – THST 6998-01

    SECTION TIME: T 7:15-9:45 p.m. – (online)

    INSTRUCTOR: DR. ROBERTO DELL’ORO

     

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    The question of the beginning is central to our understanding of the human condition.  To be born is to be given to be by a source we do not control, released into life by life itself, a miracle that escapes self-determination and control, while calling, at the same time, for responsibility and care.  How do we articulate the difficult balance between reverence for life and stewardship for the conditions that make it more livable, indeed, more human?  The course examines bioethical questions that concern the beginnings of life. Topics include the ethics of abortion, maternal fetal conflicts, ethical problems in neonatology, as well as the ethical judgment on the entire field of assisted reproductive medicine -- from in vitro fertilization, to surrogate motherhood, gamete storage techniques, and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis. 

     

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

    Engage in the critical analysis of bioethical questions at the beginning of life and articulate their theoretical and practical dimensions.

    Appreciate the importance of ethical dialogue between theology and philosophy on ethical issues at the beginning of life.

    Understand the interplay of morality and law in relation to bioethical issues at the beginning of life.

    Become familiar with the clinical context that define beginning of life questions, and recognize the ethical challenges facing health care professionals and their patients today.

     

    PREREQUISITES

    Undergraduate Degree

     

    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS

    This graduate course is a combination of lectures and student participation through discussion sessions.  Assignments include in-class presentations, essays, and a research paper (15-20 pages) by the end of the semester. 

     

    REQUIRED TEXTS

    James Mumford, Ethics at the Beginning of Life: A Phenomenological Critique (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013) – Excerpts will be provided in Brightspace

    Ronald Dworkin, Life’s Dominion: An Argument about Abortion, Euthanasia, and Individual Freedom (New York: Vintage Books, 1994)

    Luc Boltanski, The Foetal Condition: A Sociology of Engendering and Abortion (Malden: MA, Polity Press, 2013)

    Cathleen Kaveny, Law’s Virtues: Fostering Autonomy and Solidarity in American Society (Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press, 2012)

     

    BACKGROUND TEXTS

    Raymond Devettere, Practical Decision Making in Health Care Ethics: Cases and Concepts, 3rd edition (Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press, 2009)

    Albert R. Jonsen, The Birth of Bioethics (New York: Oxford University Press, 1998)

    Tom L. Beauchamp and James F. Childress, Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 7th edition (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013)

  • SPRING 2021

    COURSE TITLE: GLOBAL BIOETHICS

    COURSE NUMBER: BIOE 6500 – THST 6998-02

    SECTION TIME: R 7:15-9:45 p.m. – (online)

    INSTRUCTOR: DR. ROBERTO DELL’ORO

     

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    The notion of global bioethics has emerged out of a concern for the narrow development of official bioethical discourse, mainly defined by the success of the American versions of bioethics. Common to them all is the stress on the centrality of liberal values, like autonomy and informed consent, and a utilitarian understanding of beneficence in terms of value maximization and rational calculation of risks and benefits. The notion of global bioethics redefines the agenda of bioethics, the questions it addresses, and their importance in a renewed hierarchy of value considerations. The question of our limits to the technological extension of human life in end of life situations, or the potential applications of genetics in the area of pharmacogenomics, have generally received greater attention than issues of basic quality of life.  Among others: the availability of food or water, the provision of basic health care for conditions that would be easily treatable, climate change, availability of drinkable water, and biodiversity.  By broadening the content of bioethics, to include all the determinants of health and health care, e.g., social, political, or environmental, bioethics opens itself more explicitly to the integration of insights and preoccupations in social and environmental ethics.  Furthermore, a global bioethics poses the question of the validity of a transcultural moral framework in addressing bioethical questions.  Ultimately, a bioethics globally conceived can help us see things in a wider perspective, recognize global trends and identify as ideological mystifications universally imposed by market ideology what passes as celebration of individual autonomy and freedom of choice. 

     

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

    Understand the limitations of contemporary bioethical discourse with respect to its theoretical infrastructure, based on the four-principle approach and the premises of political liberalism.

    Appreciate the reasons for an expansion of the agenda of Western bioethics, to include global dimensions of socialand evironmental ethical discourse.

    Familiarize with the problems of global bioethics, among others: pollution and climate change, immigration and global health, global inequalities, the issues raised by global pandemics, and biodiversity.  

    Understand the importance of a universal framework of human rights in bioethics based on the principles of the dignity of the person, vulnerability, and universal solidarity.  

     

    PREREQUISITES

    Undergraduate Degree

     

    REQUIRED TEXTS

    Henk Ten Have, Global Bioethics: An Introduction (London and New York: Routledge, 2016)

    Henk Ten Have and Bert Godjin (eds), Handbook of Global Bioethics (Dordrecht: Springer, 2014) – available online

    Pope Francis, Encyclical Letter Laudato Si: On Care of Our Common Home, 2015 (at http://www.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/encyclicals/documents/papa-francesco_20150524_enciclica-laudato-si.html

    Ulrich Beck, The Metamorphosis of the World (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2016)

    Roberto B. Talisse, Engaging Political Philosophy (New York and London: Routledge, 2016)  

     

    BACKGROUND TEXTS

    Albert R. Jonsen, The Birth of Bioethics (New York: Oxford University Press, 1998)

    Tom L. Beauchamp and James F. Childress, Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 7th edition (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013)

     

    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS

    This graduate course is a combination of lectures and student participation through discussion sessions.  Assignments include in-class presentations, essays, and a research paper by the end of the semester. 

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