Additional Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Justice Courses of BCLA

Once again, America is in a moment of racial and ethnic turmoil. As LMU knowledge makers and purveyors, we are called to seek and provide clarity on society's most pressing issues. With that in mind, BCLA has compiled the following list, which features a set of Fall 2020 BCLA courses that delve into various aspects of race, ethnicity, justice, and diversity. It is meant to complement the "BCLA Anti-Racism Courses" list that was constructed shortly after the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and Toni McDade.

The list is not exhaustive; it is meant to provide advisors and students with examples of curricular resources to explore the people, places, and ideas that have traditionally been considered the "other." Please reach out to BCLA Coordinator for Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives Stefan Bradley with any questions or input. Please visit the LMU Bulletin for the most up-to-date course information.

Section I courses delve into the lived experiences of people of color and marginalized groups domestically and abroad.

  • Course Description: An introductory course which surveys the cultures and histories of Asian Pacific Americans in the United States. Interaction among various Asian Pacific American communities also will be discussed.

    University Core fulfilled: Foundations: Studies in American Diversity.

  • Course Description: This class surveys the ways in which U.S. interchanges with Asia and the Pacific Islands have transformed cultural, political, ideological, and socioeconomic developments on both sides of the Pacific from the earliest contact to the twenty-first century within global and comparative frameworks.

    University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.

  • Course Description: A survey of Asian Pacific American writers and their literature, using critical analysis of autobiographies, short stories, novels, poetry, essays, and films.

    University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Creative Experience; Flag: Writing.

  • Course Description: Topical studies of timely and pertinent contemporary interest involving Asian Pacific Americans in the United States.

    University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Understanding Human Behavior; Flag: Engaged Learning.

  • Course Description: An interdisciplinary and comparative examination of the historical role of immigration and migration in shaping the Los Angeles region as well as the social, political, economic, and cultural impact of immigration in contemporary Los Angeles.

    University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Interdisciplinary Connections; Flag: Writing.

  • Course Description: This course introduces the history of East Asia from 1600 to the present. It explores the political, socio-economic, and cultural history of China, Japan, and Korea and focuses on empire-building, economic expansion, nationalism, socialism, decolonization, and popular culture.

    University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives.

  • Course Description: A study of Asian civilizations though history, literature, art, philosophy, and film. Topics to be covered will emphasize the intellectual, cultural, social, and political factors which shaped the civilizations of Asia and the Pacific.

    University Core fulfilled: Foundations: Studies in American Diversity; Flag: Oral Skills.

  • Course Description: This course focuses on contemporary economic and political issues in Asian countries such as China, India, and Japan. China surpassed Japan as the second largest economy in February 2011. India has also grown fast, and many in the West look to it as a counterweight to China, in politics as well as in economics. The first part of the course focuses on the recent growth and development of China. Topics include: the socialist era; market transition; growth and structural change; population growth; labor and human capital; rural and urban economies; similarities and contrasts between the rise of the U.S. and the rise of China; impact of China on the world economy and financial system. The second part of the course will compare China with India and Japan.

    University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Interdisciplinary Connections; Flags: Oral Skills, Writing.

  • Course Description: The tenor and stability of the relationship between Beijing and Washington shape the tenor and stability of world order probably more than any other single driver. This course aims to illustrate the dynamics of that relationship by focusing on some of the great conceptual divides between the two great powers of the 21st century. In what ways do the two nations view each other through very different cultural and political lenses? To what extent are those perceptions, in some sense, legitimate, if not (whatever this might mean) ‘objective’? What misperceptions are the most dangerous for world peace and security? Are there remedies for these misperceptions?

  • Course Description: An interdisciplinary overview of Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies to familiarize students with historical and contemporary issues in Chicana/o and Latina/o communities.

    University Core fulfilled: Foundations: Studies in American Diversity.

  • Course Description: An overview of a range of genre, themes, and concepts created by Chicana/o and other U.S. Latina/o writers.

  • Course Description: An analytical survey of Native America, Mexican America, and the recent past with a focus on race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender, and class.

    University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Historical Analysis and Perspectives; Flag: Writing.

  • Course Description: This course focuses on the historical and contemporary politics of immigration. The course will cover issues ranging from root causes of international migration, to the various social, cultural, and political consequences of immigration in the United States.

    University Core fulfilled: Foundations: Studies in American Diversity.

  • Course Description: An investigation into current and historical immigration trends as they encompass the economy, education, language, identity, politics, and culture. There is a particular focus on globalization and Los Angeles as an immigration center.

    University Core fulfilled: Flag: Oral Skills

  • Course Description: This course is taken concurrently with CLST 5001 and is required for senior Chicana/o and Latina/o Studies majors and minors. The course focuses on historical and contemporary methods and debates in the field. Offered Fall semester only.

    Corequisite: CLST 5001.

  • Course Description:A study of the literature of the Holocaust including fiction, poetry, drama, and film.

    Fulfills Comparative or Critical/Theoretical requirement.

    Junior or senior standing required.

    University Core fulfilled: Flag: Engaged Learning

  • Course Description:This course examines concepts of justice in Latin America and applies them to social, political, and economic problems in Latin America, from 1492 to the present, to debate solutions. An engaged learning experience will allow students to add another layer of critical analysis to their historical research as they assess the Latin American experience.

    HIST Concentration: Law, Politics, and Society.

  • Course Description:This course is an introduction to the academic study of religion and of world religions, and to the religious traditions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and other current religious trends. Special emphasis is placed upon how these religious traditions have emerged within the context of Los Angeles, how they have changed, grown, and adapted to their new surroundings.

    University Core fulfilled: Foundations: Studies in American Diversity.

  • Course Description:This course provides an introduction to the field of international relations, with an emphasis on state and non-state behavior in explaining international cooperation and conflict.

    University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Understanding Human Behavior.

  • Course Description:An analysis of the problems and prospects for political, economic, and social development in Africa south of the Sahara.

    University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Interdisciplinary Connections; Flag: Writing.

  • Course Description:A comparative study of representative narratives written by Latin American, U.S. Latino/a, and/or other diasporic Spanish-speaking authors during the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Specific course content depends on the instructor.

    Prerequisite: SPAN 3510 or consent of instructor.

Section II courses address issues that affect people of color and marginalized groups.

  • Course description coming soon. 

  • Course Description: Analyzes political institutions and policies in democratic and authoritarian countries. Combines conceptual understanding with case studies from Europe, Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

    University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Understanding Human Behavior.

  • Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the field of international relations, with an emphasis on state and non-state behavior in explaining international cooperation and conflict.

    University Core fulfilled: Explorations: Understanding Human Behavior.

  • Course Description: An examination of the electoral process in the United States covering political participation, campaigns, and institutional arrangements at all levels of government.

    Juniors and Seniors only.

     

  • Course Description:The broad objective of this class is to introduce students to studying religion and its impact in the social world, including politics, social policy, community services, and social movements. We will examine the relationship between religion and society, taking into consideration both how religion is shaped by society and how religion shapes society, with an emphasis on religion in the U.S. Additionally, we will look at emerging religiously based social movement and political action.

    University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Interdisciplinary Connections; Flag: Engaged Learning.

  • Course Description:This course engages significant questions surrounding crisis and tragedy in the modern world. This course surveys how trauma at the international, communal, and personal levels of experiences are explained through the lens of faith in biblical traditions.

    University Core fulfilled: Integrations: Faith and Reason.