Nazareth Martínez, M.A. ’20 is a second year English Literature MA student from Fullerton, California. She also serves as an English Teaching Fellow. Her interests include Human-Robot interactions in Literature, Romanticism, and the Posthuman.

Q: What brought you to LMU?

A: I was really interested in the English Teaching Fellowship because I knew it was designed with future teachers in mind. The hands on experience would be indispensable for my later aspirations.

Q: What are some academic highlights you’ve had thus far during your time at LMU?

A: I was blessed enough to work on and eventually present a paper I originally wrote in undergrad at the Southwest Humanities Symposium at Arizona State University. I received feedback and further reading suggestions that were helpful and applicable to my new research. Also, some of my classmates from Dr. Mailloux’s Rhetorical Theory class and I co-authored an article for submission to Philosophy and Rhetoric and it was accepted! One of my greatest highlights, however, is the community of not only classmates, but friends I’ve made whilst in this cohort. 

Q: What are your future academic or professional plans?

A: In all honesty, I was unsure about my academic and professional plans until I took Theory of Teaching Writing and Literature with Dr. Ross during my first semester. I am forever grateful to Dr. Ross’ class for opening my eyes to the versatility of this degree. I now hope to teach in an underrepresented community like the one I came from and later pursue a Doctorate in Education to become a principal and later, superintendent.

Q: What does your research process look like?

A: I never assume I know what I’m looking for or try to assert a point from the start. I start with a question and eventually end up down a whirlwind of resources I have to polish out for my work. What I end up with is hardly ever what I start with and I think it’s better that way. That’s learning.

Q: What authors inspire your work? What is a favorite book of yours?

A: Mary Shelley and Toni Morrison are two of my favorite authors. It seems like a trick question to ask an English student their favorite book, but my answer has been Frankenstein since I was 17.

Q: Do you have any advice for incoming graduate students?

A: Be open to change and relish in your accomplishments, but always stay grounded and keep it real.