Fall 2012 Course Descriptions

Fall 2012 Level 600 THST Courses
  • THST 600.1 - Foundations of NT
  • THST 611.1 - Islam
  • THST 660.1 - Foundation of Theological Ethics
  • THST 670.1 - Foundations of Pastoral Theology
  • THST 680.1 - Comparative Theology
  • THST 685.1 - Theory of Practical Spiritual Direction
  • THST 687.1 - Psychological Foundations of Spiritual Direction
  • THST 689.1 - Supervised Pastoral Field Education
  • THST 692.1 - Graduate Pro-Seminar
  • THST 695.1 - Comprehensive Exam Seminar
  • THST 698.1 - Liberation Theology
Fall 2012 Level 400 THST Courses
  • THST 498.1 - U.S. Latino Theology
  • THST 498.2 - Contemporary Theological Ethics
  • THST 498.3 - Vatican II and Beyond


Level 600 THST Courses


COURSE TITLE: Foundations of New Testament Theology
COURSE NUMBER: THST 600
SECTION TIMES/DAYS: W, 4:30 – 7:00 pm (Fall 2012)
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Jeffrey S. Siker

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPLE TOPICS
The course objective is to acquire a working knowledge of and appreciation for the literary, historical, social, theological, and pastoral dimensions of the New Testament writings and their worlds. The course also encourages students to make connections between the New Testament writings and contemporary theological/pastoral issues.
The content of the course includes reading the New Testament, and reading extensively in secondary literature on the New Testament and its study. Principle topics include: the gospel traditions, the writings of Paul and the Pauline tradition, hermeneutics, exegetical method, the historical Jesus, the history of interpretation, and appropriating the NT for the interpretation of contemporary theological/pastoral concerns.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
1) Students will know both the content of the New Testament writings and various historical, theological, ethical, social, and pastoral issues/approaches associated with the interpretation of the New Testament.
2) Students will be able to engage in detailed exegetical analysis of New Testament passages, both from the Gospels and from the letters of Paul.
3) Students will value critical and constructive approaches to theologizing on the basis of the New Testament writings. Students will also value such critical/constructive uses of the New Testament in contemporary theological discourse.

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND
none

REQUIRED TEXTS
The New Revised Standard Version of the Bible (or another modern translation)
Aland, Synopsis of the Four Gospels (English Ed)
Brown, An Introduction to the New Testament
Dunn, Unity & Diversity in the New Testament, 2nd ed.
Gorman, Elements of Biblical Exegesis
Schneiders, The Revelatory Text, 2nd ed.

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS
Lecture/discussion
readings
Midterm Exam
two 5-7 page exegetical papers
Final Paper (15-20 pages)
class participation

COURSE TITLE: THST 611: Islam
COURSE NUMBER: THST 611
SECTION TIMES/DAYS: Section 1: Tuesdays, 7:15 to 9:45 pm
INSTRUCTOR: Amir Hussain

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS
This course will introduce students to the Islamic religious tradition. We will begin by reading a book that describes how the news media constructs reality. Having discussed media constructions of Muslim lives, we will then start our study of Islam by examining the historical developments of Islam. We will begin with a discussion of pre-Islamic Arabia before examining the life of the Prophet Muhammad. The Qur’an and the Hadith will also be discussed in this first section. Finally, we will discuss Islamic religious practices and law to end this first section. The second part of the course will examine aspects of Islamic civilization and culture. We will begin with a discussion of the split between Sunni and Shi‘i Islam. Next we will turn to an examination of Sufism, the mystical tradition in Islam. We will then discuss various Muslim communities through an examination of the life of several Muslim cities. In this section, we will discuss aspects of Islamic philosophy. The final part of the course will be concerned with the modern phenomenon of Islam. We will examine themes such as the Nation of Islam, the role of Islam in Canada and the United States, Christian-Muslim dialogue, and the study of Islam after September 11, 2001. The roles of women in Islam will be examined throughout this course.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of this course students will:
1) demonstrate that they will think both empathetically and critically about Islam and Muslims;
2) demonstrate knowledge of the histories and cultures of the Muslim world;
3) demonstrate that they have the ability to interpret texts and other cultural phenomena (such as rituals, myths, architecture) that have religious presuppositions or implications;
4) demonstrate that they will think both empathetically and critically about conflicting religious claims; and
5) through class participation and written assignments have improved their verbal and written skills.

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND
None

REQUIRED TEXTS
Neil Postman and Steve Powers, How to Watch TV News, revised edition (New York: Penguin, 2008).
Amir Hussain, Oil and Water: Two Faiths, One God (Kelowna: Copper House, 2006).
John L. Esposito, The Future of Islam (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010).
Lecture Outlines and Readings.

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS
As this is a graduate seminar, in addition to the written work, regular seminar attendance and presentation are required. Grades will be determined as follows:
15% A Book Review of 5 pages on the Postman and Powers book
15% A Book Review of 5 Pages on the Esposito book
10% Class Participation
40% A Research Paper of 25 pages
20% Seminar Presentation

COURSE TITLE: Foundations of Theological Ethics
COURSE NUMBER & SECTION: THST 660.01
SECTION TIME/DAYS: Wednesday 7:15-9:45
Instructors: Dr. Jonathan Rothchild and Elizabeth Quiros-Lee

Course Description:

This graduate course introduces students to the foundations of Christian theological ethics. We will examine the relationships between the sources, methods, articulations, insights and weaknesses, and resonances and conflicts of moral theology. Specifically, we concentrate on the interpenetration between Scriptural themes (e.g., creation, imago dei, sin, imitatio Christi, redemption), anthropological dimensions (e.g., freedom, responsibility, conscience, natural law, vulnerability), voices from tradition (e.g., Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, Calvin, Pope John Paul II), intellectual, theological, and socio-economic contexts (e.g., Protestant and Catholic Reformations, Enlightenment, Industrial Revolution, movements of liberation, postmodernity), contemporary theological perspectives and debates, and practical moral questions (e.g., sexual ethics/marriage and family, biomedical ethics, economic justice, criminal justice, and environmental ethics). The objective is to analyze critically these intersections to understand the theoretical and practical dimensions of theological ethics.

Student Learning Outcomes:
The purpose of the course is to help students to:
-Understand the Scriptural, historical, doctrinal, and experiential dimensions of Christian reflection in the moral life.
-Examine and critically compare different methodological approaches within Christian theological ethics.
-Engage in a careful analysis of the relationship between foundational frameworks of moral theology and contemporary normative problems.
-Appreciate the normative implications of arguments and issues and to value their wider theological, ethical, pastoral, and social implications.

Prerequisites:
Graduate status.

Required Texts:
- Lisa Sowle Cahill, Sex, Gender, and Christian Ethics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996 (9780521578486)
- Charles Curran, Catholic Moral Theology in The United States. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press, 2008 (9781589011960)
- Gustavo Gutiérrez. We Drink from Our Own Wells: The Spiritual Journey of a People. Maryknoll: Orbis, 2003. (978-1570754968)
- Jean Porter, Natural and Divine Law: Reclaiming the Tradition for Christian Ethics. Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans, 1999 (2-89507-001-6)
- Paul Ramsey, Basic Christian Ethics. Library of Theological Ethics. Louisville: Westminster/ John Knox Press, 1993 [1950]. (0-664-25324-5)
- Darlene Fozard Weaver, The Acting Person and Christian Morality. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press, 2011 (9781589017726)
-Additional readings to be found on Blackboard.

Course Work:
Attendance/ Participation: 10 %
Midterm Exam: 25%
5 Critical response papers: 25%
Presentation: 10%
Research Paper: 30%

COURSE TITLE: FOUNDATIONS OF PASTORAL THEOLOGY
COURSE NUMBER: THST 670.01
SECTION TIMES/DAYS: 01/Tuesday 4:30 – 7:00 pm at Orange Off Site Campus
INSTRUCTOR: Michael P. Horan

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS
This course will offer a foundation in pastoral theology for the students in the Orange (Off Site) Cohort by exploring the contemporary "lay ministry explosion" in Catholicism, with emphasis on the professional leadership ministries that the church in the USA witnesses of late. This phenomenon offers the context for engaging in pastoral theology and allows us to step back even while engaged in it, in order to consider the nature, tasks, style and purpose of pastoral theology in relation to other branches of theology. In an effort to do this, the course will be grounded in the biblical, historical, sociological and theological sources for constructing a theology of pastoral ministry appropriate to various settings; through this course we will consider various "models" of pastoral theology as we consider the theological issues beneath the practice of professional lay pastoral ministry today.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students who complete this course will be able:
1. To understand and articulate selected theological issues beneath the practice of lay leadership ministry today, with special attention to the Catholic context for pastoral ministry as practiced in the United States;
2. To analyze selected theological issues embedded in the official church documents and the writings of theologians on the topic of ministry;
3. To name and develop some elements needed to construct a theology of ministry that is faithful to the biblical and historical heritage of ministry, and adequate to the contemporary experience of Catholic lay and ordained ministers today;
4. To explain to peers and to the publics they serve select features of the relationship between theology and the pastoral life of the church, with special emphasis on the Catholic church’s current life and current events that impact ministerial practice.

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND
Acceptance into Orange Cohort

REQUIRED TEXTS
Gula, Richard M. Just Ministry. New York: Paulist, 2010.
Hahnenberg, Edward P. Ministries: A Relational Approach. New York: Herder and Herder, 2003.
And TBA

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS
Five Analysis Papers and Take Home Examination 

COURSE TITLE: INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE THEOLOGY
COURSE NUMBER: THST 680
SECTION TIMES/DAYS: TUESDAYS 4:30-7:00PM
INSTRUCTOR: JAMES FREDERICKS

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS
This course is an introduction to the major theories and practices of comparative theology. As such, the course will address the debate over the theology of religions and will provide an introduction to the history and doctrines of various religions in dialogue with Christianity. Special attention will be given to Judaism, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning outcomes include:
(1) the development of skills for doing theology comparatively,
(2) a familiarity with the history and basic doctrines of several religious traditions, and
(3) a familiarity with the Catholic Church’s multiple responses to the fact of religious diversity in light of globalization.

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND
THST graduate students

REQUIRED TEXTS
1. Paul Knitter, Introducing Theologies of Religions
2. Francis X. Clooney, Comparative Theology
3. James L. Fredericks, Buddhists and Christians: Through Comparative Theology to a New Solidarity
4. Other books TBA
5. Assorted essays (available on-line as PDFs)

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS
Several short essays during the semester. A research paper of 20-25 pages at the end of the semester.

THST 685: THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF SPIRITUAL DIRECTION
MONDAYS 4:30-7:00PM
Wilkie Au, Ph.D. Fall, 2012


Goals and Objectives of the Course:
This course seeks to further the student’s understanding of spiritual direction as a form of pastoral care and as a helping relationship. Among the topics to be considered are: various forms of spiritual guidance within the Christian tradition, the distinctive nature of spiritual direction, the qualities, aptitudes and skills required to be an effective spiritual director, dynamics of a spiritual direction relationship, and the role of spiritual direction in facilitating spiritual growth and development.

Student Learning Outcomes:
The student will be able to explain the process of spiritual direction, the role of the spiritual director, and the potential benefits of spiritual direction as a spiritual discipline.
The student will be able to demonstrate the possession of a contemplative attitude towards reality and the ability to facilitate a contemplative attitude in others.
The student will discern whether s/he has a call to the ministry of spiritual direction

Prerequisites/Recommended Background
It is highly recommended that students be in a spiritual direction relationship while completing the spiritual direction concentration

Required Text
--Au, Wilkie. The Enduring Heart: Spirituality for the Long Haul (Mahwah, New Jersey: Paulist Press, 2000).
--Bakke, Jeannette. Holy Invitations: Exploring Spiritual Direction (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Books, 2000).
--Barry, William and Connolly, William. The Practice of Spiritual Direction (New York: The Seabury Press, 1982).
--Borysenko, Joan and Dveirin, Gordon. Your Spiritual Compass: What is Spiritual Guidance (New York: Hay House, Inc., 2007).
--Guenther, Margaret. Holy Listening: The Art of Spiritual Direction (Boston: Cowley Publications, 1992).
--Ruffing, Janet. Spiritual Direction: Beyond the Beginnings (Mahwah, New Jersey: Paulist Press, 2000).
--Course Reader (To be purchased at first class).

COURSE WORK/REQUIREMENTS
1) Class Attendance and active participation in class activities and structured exercises.
2) Reading of all assigned materials, noting salient points and questions to be discussed in class.
3) Two short 2-3 page (double-spaced) "Personal Reflection/Awareness" Papers.
4) One eight-page (double-spaced) Final Paper: Listening for People's God Experience

COURSE NUMBER: THST 687
COURSE TITLE: PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF PASTORAL MINISTRY
TIMES/DAYS: MONDAY, 4:30PM to 7;00PM
INSTRUCTOR: DR. NOREEN CANNON AU

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS
This course explores the psychological aspects of pastoral ministry, and in particular, the ministry of spiritual direction as a helping relationship. The focus in this course is the cultivation of the communication skills needed to be an effective pastoral minister and spiritual director. Principal topics to be covered include the following: a generic helping process for spiritual direction, pastoral counseling, and formation in various pastoral settings; the importance of self-knowledge and personal awareness on the part of ministers; the nature of empathic understanding and its relationship to psychological and spiritual growth; basic listening skills.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students will demonstrate their understanding of the difference between spiritual direction and psychotherapy by describing the process of spiritual direction in facilitating spiritual development and the role of the spiritual director in that process.
Students will demonstrate the skills of active listening, empathic understanding, and facilitative intervention in the helping relationship through structured classroom experiences.
Students will deepen their self-knowledge by reflecting on their personal traits, attitudes, and characteristics that relate to their effectiveness as spiritual directors.

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMMENDED BACKGROUND
For those concentrating in Spiritual Direction in the Master’s in Pastoral Theology, THST 685, The Theory and Practice of Spiritual Direction, is a prerequisite for this course.

REQUIRED TEXT:
1) A Course Reader (TO BE PURCHASED ON THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS)
2) Transforming Our Painful Emotions by Evelyn E. Whitehead and James D. Whitehead (Orbis Books, 2010).
3) Urgings of the Heart: Toward a Spirituality of Integration by Noreen Cannon and Wilkie Au (Paulist Press, 1995).

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATONS
1) All students (including auditors) will be expected to do the required reading, turn in a weekly summary/personal reflection paper on that week’s assigned reading, and participate in both class discussions and structured classroom experiences.
2) All students will be expected to have a weekly (30 minute) listening praxis with a trusted friend or spouse. Further explanation of this assignment will be given during the first class meeting.
3) All students (including auditors) will be expected to write a final 10-page integrative paper that articulates their reflections and insights gained during the semester from both cognitive and experiential aspects of the course.
4) All students (including auditors) will give a class presentation based on their final integrative paper.

Title: Supervised Pastoral Field Education (Contextual Education Seminar)
Course Number: THST 689-1
Section Times/Days: MONDAYS 7:15-9:45PM
Instructor: Dr. Brett C. Hoover, CSP

Description:

Drawing upon an interdisciplinary framework, this field education seminar addresses ministerial leadership aimed at the whole person in the service of faith communities for the sake of God’s Reign. It offers foundational concepts and skills required for effectiveness in ministry that is contextual, collaborative, and intercultural. In a dialogical classroom context that models collaborative ministry, THST 689 seeks to engage students in theological reflection and ministry skill development. It helps students reflect on required supervised field education experiences either at their full-time ministry or in some other approved ministry environment. It aims to enable students to weave together theological, ministerial, and educational insights and understandings. As present and future leaders in the church, students learn so that they may also be able to teach and train others in what they learn.

Student Learning Outcomes:
As a result of this course, students will be able to make use of practical theological method in theological reflection; to articulate with appropriate terminology the connections between their experiences of ministry and the theology they are learning; to articulate key contextual factors—environmental, cultural, psychological, spiritual and ecclesial—that impact particular ministry sites; to facilitate work and learning groups in the context of ministry; to identify and demonstrate improvement in the interpersonal and leadership skills necessary for effective ministry today.

Pre-requisites:
THST 600 and THST 670.

Required Texts:
Helen Cameron, Resourcing Mission: Practical Theology for Changing Churches (London: CSM Press, 2010).
Jeffrey H. Mahan, Barbara B. Troxell, and Carol J. Allen in Shared Wisdom: A Guide to Case Study Reflection in Ministry (Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1993).
Christian Scharen, Faith as a Way of Life: A Vision for Pastoral Leadership (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2008).

Course Work:
Expectations for this class include some form of ministry, regular meetings with a ministry supervisor of your choice, keeping a theological journal, a few one-page reflection papers, a visit to Catholic worship in a cultural milieu different from your own, and a final project—paper or oral presentation to the professor.

FALL 2012 – THST 662
GRADUATE PROSEMINAR
TUESDAYS 4:30-7:00PM
DR. ROBERTO DELL’ORO
rdelloro@lmu.edu

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS:
The course will introduce students to the study of Christian theology. It will do so by way of a hermeneutics of the Christian tradition in its historical unfolding and the encounter with its main theological articulators. Questions of theological method will also be addressed, but the focus will be on the matter itself: the content of the Christian faith, the process of its progressive articulation in Scripture and tradition, and the different forms (paradigms) of theological discourse developed throughout the history of the church.
In particular the following paradigms will be analyzed: (1) the Jewish apocalyptic paradigm of earliest Christianity; (2) the ecumenical Hellenistic paradigm of Christian antiquity; (3) the Roman Catholic paradigm of the Middle Ages; (4) the Protestant evangelical paradigm of the Reformation; (5) the paradigm of modernity, oriented on reason and progress; (6) the current paradigm of post-modernity. Among other theologians, the following will be studied in conjunction with the above mentioned paradigms: Paul, Origen, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther, and Friedrich Schleiermacher.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
To introduce students to basic questions of Christian theology
To develop an understanding of the historical unfolding of the Christian tradition
To appreciate the historical and systematic significance of different theological paradigms
To recognize the central theological preoccupations of main Christian thinkers

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND
Undergraduate degree

REQUIRED TEXTS
Josef Ratzinger, Introduction to Christianity (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2004) – [IC]
Hans Küng, Christianity: Essence, History, and Future (New York: Continuum, 2006) –[C]
Hans Küng, Great Christian Thinkers (New York: Continuum, 1994) – [GCT]

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS
This graduate course is a combination of lectures and student participation.

COURSE TITLE: Comprehensive Exam Seminar
COURSE NUMBER: THST 695.01
SECTION TIMES/DAYS: Wednesdays 7:15-9:45pm
INSTRUCTOR: Tiemeier

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS
This is the required comprehensive exam seminar for all MA in Theology students enrolled in the 42-unit program. While drawing on students’ previous course work, the seminar also requires students to study additional sources that will help them integrate their theological education and provide a foundation for their research projects. The comprehensive exams will be administered as a part of the course requirements.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students will:
Review and assess major Christian thinkers;
Articulate and evaluate major theological themes;
Construct theological arguments;
Integrate their theological studies.

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND
36 units of course work completed. (Students with at least 30 units may petition the Graduate Curriculum Committee for permission to enroll.)

REQUIRED TEXTS
Required:
1. Alister E. McGrath, The Christian Theology Reader, 4th Ed.
2. M. Shawn Copeland, Enfleshing Freedom: Body, Race, and Being.
3. Gustavo Gutiérrez, A Theology of Liberation.
4. Elizabeth Johnson, She Who Is.
5. Peter Phan, Being Religious Interreligiously: Asian Perspectives on Interfaith Dialogue.
6. Karl Rahner, Foundations of Christian Faith.
Additional books chosen in consultation with the instructor.

Recommended:
Francis Schussler Fiorenza and J. Galvin, Systematic Theology: Roman Catholic Perspectives.

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS
1. Attendance and participation in seminar discussions. (Oral examination occurs in class.)
2. One general exam in theology (10 page take-home exam).
3. One special topic exam in Biblical Theology, Comparative Theology, Historical Theology, Theological Ethics/Moral Theology, or Spirituality/Liturgy/Faith&Culture (10 page take-home exam).
4. One research proposal (10 page proposal of research seminar topic).
Note: Students must pass every component of the seminar in order to pass the course.

COURSE TITLE: Liberation Theologies
COURSE NUMBER: 698.1
SECTION TIME/DAYS: 01 W 4:30 -7:00 PM
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Allan Figueroa Deck, SJ

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPLE TOPICS:
The course will explore liberation theologies as they have developed over the past 50 years and will focus on the following questions:
What is liberation theology? What is the historical background that gave rise to it? How is it understood as a contextual theology?
What is its method? 
What are its geographic manifestations among diverse ethnicities, social classes, genders, and sexual orientations?
How have theologians and other Church leaders (Catholic and ecumenical) received and assessed liberation theology?
How does liberation theology relate to a) Catholic Social Teaching and b) pastoral theology?

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
A critical understanding of the nature, purpose and method of liberation theologies as developed by some of its major exponents
Insight into the place, function and critique of liberation theologies within the broader Christian theological horizon
Deeper appreciation of the relationship between liberation theologies, Catholic Social Teaching and pastoral theology

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND:
None

REQUIRED TEXTS:
Eduardo Fernández, SJ, La Cosecha: Harvesting Contemporary U.S. Hispanic Theology, Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2000
Gustavo Gutiérrez, A Theology of Liberation: History, Politics and Salvation, Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1988
Nancy Pineda-Madrid, Suffering and Salvation in Ciudad Juárez, Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press, 2011

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS:
1) Two 5 page critical book reviews
2) A Mid-Term Exam
3) A final project presented orally in class along with a 15-20 page research paper

Level 400 THST Courses

COURSE TITLE: U.S. Latino/a Theology
COURSE NUMBER: THST 498 1
SECTION TIMES/DAYS: T 4:30-7:00 PM
INSTRUCTOR: Cecilia González-Andrieu, PhD.

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS
This course examines the diverse origins and theological expressions of Latino/a/Hispanic Christian communities in the U.S. with a special emphasis on the Catholic Tradition. The course provides an overview of some of the unique contributions to Christian Theology arising out of Latino/a communities of faith such as Teología en Conjunto, Cotidianidad, Mestizaje, accompaniment and aesthetics. The course also critically engages some of the challenges and opportunities presented to the church by the many communities grouped under the term "Latino/Hispanic" by examining demographic studies, pastoral letters, the work of special commissions on Hispanic Ministry and other "pulse-taking" strategies.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will analyze and interpret primary historical texts to carefully contextualize the origins and endurance of U.S. Latino/a communities.
The student will critically examine a range of theological concepts arising out of Latino/a religious practices and experiences and assess their contribution to Christian Theology.
The student will analyze and judge pertinent contemporary studies and data dealing with the community’s demographics and the Church’s response.
The student will formulate and articulate strategies to meet the challenge posed to the church by the needs and gifts of the community through their own particular area of interest (pastoral ministry, ecumenism, ethics, liturgical practices, religious education, etc.)

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND
This seminar is for Theological Studies Majors and Minors.

REQUIRED TEXTS
- Matovina, Timothy, Latino Catholicism: Transformation in America’s Largest Church. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2011. ISBN: 9780691139791.
González, Justo L. Mañana: Christian Theology from a Hispanic Perspective. Nashville : Abingdon Press, 1990. ISBN-13: 978-0687230679.
- Matovina, Timothy and Gerald E. Poyo, eds. ¡Presente! U.S. Latino Catholics from Colonial Origins to the Present. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 2000. ISBN-13: 978-1570753282.
- Padilla, Goizueta and Villafañe, eds. Hispanic Christian Thought At the Dawn of 21st Century: Apuntes in Honor of Justo L. González, Abingdon Press, 2005. ISBN-13: 978-0687098132
- Selected articles, demographic studies, and other materials in electronic Course Reader.

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS
Engagement with all course readings evidenced in active and informed participation in class discussions.
Regular class attendance.
"Faith Meets Culture En La Ciudad de Los Angeles" research and presentation.
Outside research with a Latino/a community of faith or non-profit involved in Latino/a issues.
Semester-long development of a Final Research Paper encompassing a Prospectus, Midterm colloquium, first draft and final draft.

 

THST 498 – CONTEMPORARY THEOLOGICAL ETHICS
WEDNESDAYS 7:15-9:45PM
PROFESSOR: DR. ROBERTO DELL’ORO
Email:

rdelloro@lmu.edu

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course will introduce students to the main themes, problems, and authors in contemporary theological ethics. After a historical introduction, dealing with different models of ethical thinking, the course will look at the biblical roots of theology ethics, the relation between faith and moral reason, the debate on normative theories, and action theory. Applications to contemporary issues in the fields of bioethics, social, and sexual ethics, will be used to exemplify the meaning and function of different foundational frameworks and the relation between theory and practice in theological ethics.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
To introduce students to basic questions and themes theological ethics
To learn critical tools for ethical decision making
To relate foundational frameworks to concrete normative problems
To understand how theological themes inform and shape moral arguments and ultimately moral life.

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND
The class is open to majors and minors in theology. Other students will be admitted only with the professor’s permission.

REQUIRED TEXT
Richard M. Gula, Reason Informed by Faith: Foundations of Catholic Morality (New York: Paulist Press, 1989)
Patricia Beattie Jung and Shannon Jung, Moral Issues and Christian Responses (2003)
Robin Gill, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Christian Ethics (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 2001)
Additional material will be submitted in the course of the semester

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS
This course is a combination of lectures and student participation. Assignments include one written in-class presentation, midterm and final exam, and a research paper (10-15 pages).

 

 

 

 

 

COURSE TITLE: Vatican II and Beyond: Faith, Culture, and the Global Church
COURSE NUMBER: THST 498.03
SECTION TIMES/DAYS: Mondays and Wednesdays 3:00-4:15 pm
INSTRUCTOR: Tiemeier

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS
This seminar examines the primary documents of Vatican II and reflects on the challenges of the contemporary global Church that have emerged in the wake of Vatican II. The first half of the course focuses on the history and theology of Vatican II. The second half of the course probes issues of faith, culture, and liberation, moving from Latin American, to Asian, to African contexts in order to more fully understand the legacy of Vatican II for the worldwide Church.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students will:
1. Read and assess the primary documents of Vatican II;
2. Analyze major theological issues emerging in the wake of Vatican II for the contemporary global Church;
3. Appreciate the complexity of Vatican II theology and the challenges of theologizing in the modern world.

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND
Theology Major/Minor Standing

REQUIRED TEXTS
Required:
1. Austin Flannery, Ed., Vatican II: Constitutions, Decrees, Declarations.
2. Giuseppe Alberigo, A Brief History of Vatican II.
3. Joseph Ratzinger, Theological Highlights of Vatican II.
4. Gustavo Gutiérrez, A Theology of Liberation.
5. Peter Phan, Being Religious Interreligiously: Asian Perspectives on Interfaith Dialogue.
6. Agbonkhianmeghe E. Orobator, Theology Brewed in an African Pot.
Additional readings posted on My LMU Connect and Vatican website.

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS
1. Attendance and participation in seminar discussions.
2. Weekly reading papers (1 page).
3. One analysis paper on a theme in the Vatican II documents (10 pages).
4. One research paper on a contemporary theological issue in dialogue with Vatican II (10 pages).
Note: Students will be expected, if possible, to attend LMU’s Vatican II @ 50 event on October 11th.