Spring 2013 Course Descriptions

Level 600 THST Courses

  • THST 620 - Foundations of Historical Theology
  • THST 630 - Introduction to Systematic Theology
  • THST 652 - The Rites
  • THST 670 - Foundations of Pastoral Theology
  • THST 673 - Faith & Culture
  • THST 686 - Ignatian Spirituality & Discernment
  • THST 688 - Praciticum and Supervision in Spiritual Direction
  • THST 689 - Supervised Pastoral Field Education
  • THST 696 - Research & Writing
  • THST 698 - Gospel of Matthew

Level 400 THST Courses

Please note that in order to take a 400 level THST

course for Graduate course credit, instructor and

department approval are required.

  • THST 431 - Theotokos
  • THST 481 - Islam in the Modern World

Level 600 THST Courses

COURSE TITLE: Foundations of Historical Theology
COURSE NUMBER:  THST 620 
SECTION TIMES/DAYS:  Thursday, 7:10 pm  -- 10:10 pm 
OFFICE HOURS:  Wednesday, 10 am – 2:00 pm and by appointment
Email: annaharrison@lmu.edu Phone: 310-568-6236

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS
This course examines select topics in western Christian theology from the patristic and medieval periods.  Our approach is primarily that of intellectual history.  Topics on which we focus are: faith, reason, and culture; church and society; Christ.  We proceed through a close reading of primary texts, written by women and men, in a variety of genres, including commentaries on scripture, formal theological treatises, Lives of saints, and visionary literature.  Among the authors we read are Origen, Augustine, Gregory the Great, Bernard of Clairvaux, Anselm of Canterbury, Abelard, Gertrude of Helfta, and Thomas Aquinas.  We will situate our study in the larger context of medieval religious attitudes and devotional practices.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students who complete this course successfully will gain an understanding of some of the basic theological questions late antique and medieval people took up as well as a variety of responses to questions of interest for over 1500 years.  Students will learn how to read carefully medieval texts and scholarly works on medieval theology.  They will learn to write historically responsible analyses of texts significant to medieval theology.  They will come to value learning about the questions medieval people asked as well as the religious ideas and experiences of women and men who lived in a world very different from our own. 

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND
Students with a willingness to wonder and to work hard!

REQUIRED TEXTS
To be determined

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS
Students are required to read carefully all assigned texts before class.  Because this is a seminar, students are expected to contribute regularly and thoughtfully to class discussions.  Each week, each student will be required to take primary responsibility in presenting the content of a text or texts.  Attendance is required, and students’ in-class participation will be evaluated.  More than one absence will lower a student’s final grade by one full grade.  (For example, a “B” will become a “C.”)  Students are responsible for writing a short paper (2-4 pp.) almost every week.  (The first paper is due on the first day of class.)  Students are, in addition, responsible for a number of formal presentations.

COURSE TITLE: The Rites
COURSE NUMBER: THST 652.01
SECTION TIMES/DAYS: T, 7:15 p.m. – 9:45 p.m.
INSTRUCTOR: Nicholas Denysenko, Ph.D.

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS
Catholic, Orthodox, and some Reformed Churches regularly celebrate a core group of rites that constitute a regular and occasional liturgical cycle. This class will study the history and theology of the following rites: Baptism, Confirmation (Chrismation), the Eucharistic Liturgy, Penance/Reconciliation, Anointing of the Sick. Readings provide a comprehensive overview of the history and theological trajectory of the studied rites. In the first part of the semester, class sessions will consist of three core components: 1) a brief review session of the historical development of the rite, to enable student understanding of each rite’s particular genetic development (facilitated by the professor); 2) a detailed examination and discussion of liturgical components, such as prayers, hymns, assigned lections, and ritual gestures, to develop a liturgical theology of the contemporary rite (facilitated by the professor); 3) a discussion of a particular pastoral, ethical, or theological issue belonging to the rite, based on one or more assigned articles (presented and facilitated by students). This section of the course will focus on the Rites of the Catholic Church. The final two sessions will revisit critical questions on ritual celebration by exploring them through comparative liturgy, namely an examination of two case studies in the Byzantine liturgical tradition. In the last part of the semester, students will formally present their research to the rest of the class. Assessments include critical analysis papers on assigned topics and readings and a formal research paper and presentation on a topic pertaining to one of the rites.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

• Students will learn the historical development of five liturgical rites of West and East.
• Students will become versed in the environmental factors shaping transitions in the historical development of the rites. 
• Students will become familiar with the core liturgical structures and prayers of the rites.
• Students will develop skills in studying, analyzing, and articulating a liturgical theology of the rites by using the method “context and text.”
• Students will be able to articulate reflections on sensitive pastoral, ethical, and theological issues associated with contemporary celebration of the rites.
• Students will be able to critically reflect on the relevance of the rites in the lived experience of communities and their people. 

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND
Prior graduate coursework in theological studies.

REQUIRED TEXTS
Maxwell Johnson, The Rites of Christian Initiation
Paul Bradshaw and Johnson, eds., The Eucharistic Liturgies: Their Evolution and Interpretation
Marcel Metzger, The Historical Development of the Liturgy

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS
Regular and frequent participation in class discussion.
Three critical analysis papers (5 pages each) 
One Critical Book Review (5 pages)
One research paper and formal presentation, with feedback (25 pages)

COURSE TITLE:  FOUNDATIONS OF PASTORAL THEOLOGY

COURSE NUMBER:   THST 670.01

SECTION TIMES/DAYS: 01/Tuesday 4:30 – 7:00 pm

INSTRUCTOR:   Michael P. Horan

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS

This course will offer a foundation in pastoral theology for the students in the Orange (Off Site) Cohort by exploring the contemporary “lay ministry explosion” in Catholicism, with emphasis on the professional leadership ministries that the church in the USA witnesses of late. This phenomenon offers the context for engaging in pastoral theology and allows us to step back even while engaged in it, in order to consider the nature, tasks, style and purpose of pastoral theology in relation to other branches of theology. In an effort to do this, the course will be grounded in the biblical, historical, sociological and theological sources for constructing a theology of pastoral ministry appropriate to various settings; through this course we will consider various “models” of pastoral theology as we consider the theological issues beneath the practice of professional lay pastoral ministry today.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students who complete this course will be able:

1. To understand and articulate selected theological issues beneath the practice of lay leadership ministry today, with special attention to the Catholic context for pastoral ministry as practiced in the United States;
2. To analyze selected theological issues embedded in the official church documents and the writings of theologians on the topic of ministry;
3. To name and develop some elements needed to construct a theology of ministry that is faithful to the biblical and historical heritage of ministry, and adequate to the contemporary experience of Catholic lay and ordained ministers today; 
4. To explain to peers and to the publics they serve select features of the relationship between theology and the pastoral life of the church, with special emphasis on the Catholic church’s current life and current events that impact ministerial practice. 

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND

Acceptance into Orange Cohort

REQUIRED TEXTS

Gula, Richard M. Just Ministry. New York: Paulist, 2010.

Hahnenberg, Edward P.  Ministries: A Relational Approach.  New York: Herder and Herder, 2003.
  
And TBA

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS

Five Analysis Papers and Take Home Examination

 

COURSE TITLE: Faith and Culture

COURSE NUMBER: THST 673.01

SECTION TIMES/DAYS: W 4:30 pm - 7:00 pm

INSTRUCTOR: Fr  Dorian Llywelyn, SJ

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS

The seminar will introduce students to the investigation of the complex relationship between religious faith and ambient culture. It treats culture (1) as a theological category in its own right, one intimately related to the considerations of Christology, Trinitarian theology, and ecclesiology; (2) as a pastoral focus related to questions of evangelization, missiology, and inculturation; and (3) as an epistemological and hermeneutical bridge for engaging in ecumenical and inter-religious dialogue, as well as the encounter with modernity. Topics studied include models of culture in engagement with faith; scriptural and classical theological sources for engaging with faith and culture; the theme of culture in the Second Vatican Council; religion and ethno-cultural identity; culture and lived religion; multiculturalism and religious plurality; faith and culture in encounter with postmodernity and globalization; faith, culture, and local experience.


STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

(1) Students will understand how culture operates as a theological category
(2) Students will be familiar with the theological implications of contemporary discussions on culture
(3) Students will be able to reflect theologically on the cultural dimensions of lived religion, and apply this reflection to their own professional and personal concerns.

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND

The class is open to all THST graduate students.  It is recommended that students have already taken one or more of the following: Introduction to New Testament Theology; Foundations of Historical Theology; Introduction to Systematic Theology.


REQUIRED TEXTS

Gerald Arbuckle, Culture, Inculturation and Theologians: A Post-Modern Critique
D. A. Carson, Christ and Culture Revisited 
Michael Paul Gallagher, Clashing Symbols: An Introduction to Faith and Culture, new and revised. ed.
H. Richard Niebuhr, Christ and Culture
Robert J. Scheiter, The New Catholicity: Theology Between the Global and the Local
Kathryn Tanner, Theories of Culture: A New Agenda for Catholicity
Additional readings will be made available on EREs.


COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS

  • Discussions          20%
  • In-class presentation         10%
  • Short paper on off-site visit        10%
  • Mid-term research paper         25%
  • Final research paper:           35%


TERM:  SPRING, 2012
COURSE TITLE:  IGNATIAN SPIRITUALITY AND DISCERNMENT
COURSE No. & SECTION: THST 686
SECTION TIMES/DAYS:  4:30-7:00 PM; Monday
INSTRUCTOR:  DR. WILKIE AU
 
COURSE DESCRIPTION:  
 This course seeks to further the student's understanding of the spirituality of Ignatius of Loyola by (1) a close reading of his spiritual classic, The Spiritual Exercises, (2) study of commentary on the text, (3) reading of contemporary authors re: Ignatian themes, and (4) learning from the actual experience of the group during the semester.  Regarding (4), the instructor's hypothesis is that some of the dynamics of the Spiritual Exercises can be experienced in a group when it engages in a critical and prayerful approach to them.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
--Students will demonstrate an understanding of the structure and dynamics of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius.
--Students will demonstrate an understanding of the Ignatius wisdom regarding discernment and the ability to apply it to their own lives.
--Students will demonstrate an understanding of Ignatius forms of prayer.

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND:  Graduate status

REQUIRED TEXTS/REFERENCES:
--Draw Me Into Your Friendship: A Literal Translation & A Contemporary Reading of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius 
by David Fleming, S.J. (St. Louis, Missouri:  The Institute of Jesuit Sources, (1996).ISBN 1-880810-20-4 (pkb.)
--Finding God in All Things: A Companion to the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius by William A. Barry, S.J. (Notre Dame, Indiana: Ave Maria Press, 1991).  ISBN 0-87793-460-6 (pbk.)
--An Ignatian Spirituality Reader edited by George W. Traub, S.J.  (Chicago: Loyola Press, 2008).  ISBN-10: 0-8294-2723-3.
--The Discerning Heart: Exploring the Christian Path by Wilkie Au and Noreen Cannon Au (Mahwah, New Jersey:  Paulist Press, available 1/2006).  ISBN: 0-8091-4372-0(pbk.)
--Inner Compass: An Invitation to Ignatian Spirituality by Margaret Silf (Chicago: Loyola University Press, 2007). 
ISBN 0-8294-2645-8
--A Course Reader (to be purchased at the first class)

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS:
1)  Weekly attendance and active participation
2)  1-page reflection paper on weekly praxis, i.e. 1-hour  experience of solitude centered on a reading
3)   5-page final integration paper
4)   Class presentation based on final integration paper
5)   Final exam


SPRING, 2012
COURSE TITLE:  Practicum and Supervision in Spiritual Direction
COURSE NUMBER:  THST 688  
SECTION TIMES/DAYS: 4:30-7:00PM; Tuesday  
INSTRUCTOR:  Wilkie Au, Ph.D.

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS

The art of spiritual direction is best fostered through practice and reflection on that practice in a supervisory setting.  This course will give students an opportunity to grow in spiritual direction skills, self-awareness, and interior freedom under the guidance of an experienced spiritual director.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

1.  Students will demonstrate their awareness of the dynamics of a spiritual direction session by writing and reflecting on a verbatim of each direction session.
2.  Students will demonstrate their ability to notice and articulate  their own inner experience as they listen to the stories of others as spiritual directors.  
3  Students will identify what in their own personality structure and dynamics helps and/or hinders their effective functioning as spiritual directors.
4.  Students will demonstrate their knowledge of various spiritual disciplines and their understanding of how they can facilitate 1he spiritual development of others.

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND:
--Completion of THST 685, The Theory and Practice of Spiritual Direction
--Completion of THST 687, Psychological Foundations of Spiritual Direction
--While not required as a prerequisite, it is highly preferred that THST 686, Ignatian Spirituality and Discernement be completed before taking the practicum and supervision course.

REQUIRED TEXTS

--Au, Wilkie and Noreen, THE GRATEFUL HEART: LIVING THE CHRISTIAN MESSAGE , Mahwah, New Jersey: Paulist Press, 2011, ISBN:  978-0-8091-4735-9
-- --Conroy, Maureen.  LOOKING INTO THE WELL: SUPERVISION OF SPIRITUAL DIRECTORS
Chicago:  Loyola  University Press, 1995,  ISBN:  0-8294-0827-4
--Buckley, Suzanne,  SACRED  IS THE CALL: FORMATION AND TRANSFORMATION IN SPIRITUAL DIRECTION PROGRAMS, New York: The Crossroad Publishing Company, 2005.  ISBN 0-8245-2338-5.
--Xeroxed Journal Articles

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS

1. Completion of all assigned readings and active participation in weekly classes.
2.  Ongoing spiritual direction sessions with two spiritual directees, spaced in two-week intervals.
3.  A Contemplative Reflection Form transcript of each spiritual direction session.  
4.  A psychospiritual autobiography that highlights one’s developmental history and its relevance to one’s practice as a spiritual director
 

Title:  Supervised Pastoral Field Education (Contextual Education Seminar)
Course Number:  THST 689-01
Section Times/Days:  W 7:15 – 9:45 pm
Instructor:  Dr. Brett C. Hoover, CSP

Description:  Drawing upon an interdisciplinary framework, this field education seminar addresses ministerial leadership aimed at the whole person in the service of faith communities for the sake of God’s Reign.  It offers foundational concepts and skills required for effectiveness in ministry that is contextual, collaborative, and intercultural.  In a dialogical classroom context that models collaborative ministry, THST 689 seeks to engage students in theological reflection and ministry skill development.  It helps students reflect on required supervised field education experiences either at their full-time ministry or in some other approved ministry environment.  It aims to enable students to weave together theological, ministerial, and educational insights and understandings.  As present and future leaders in the church, students learn so that they may also be able to teach and train others in what they learn.

Student Learning Outcomes: As a result of this course, students will be able to make use of practical theological method in theological reflection; to articulate with appropriate terminology the connections between their experiences of ministry and the theology they are learning; to articulate key contextual factors—environmental, cultural, psychological, spiritual and ecclesial—that impact particular ministry sites; to facilitate work and learning groups in the context of ministry; to identify and demonstrate improvement in the interpersonal and leadership skills necessary for effective ministry today.

Pre-requisites:  THST 600 and THST 670.

Required Texts:
Jeffrey H. Mahan, Barbara B. Troxell, and Carol J. Allen in Shared Wisdom: A Guide to Case Study Reflection in Ministry (Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1993).
Marti R. Jewell and David A. Ramey, The Changing Face of Church (Chicago: Loyola, 2010).

Course Work:
Expectations for this class include some form of ministry, regular meetings with a ministry supervisor, keeping a theological journal, a few one-page reflection papers, a visit to Catholic worship in a cultural milieu different from your own, and a final project—paper or oral presentation to the professor.

 

COURSE TITLE:  The Gospel of Matthew

COURSE NUMBER:  THST 698

SECTION TIMES/DAYS:  01 (W 4:30-7:00)

INSTRUCTOR:   Judy Yates Siker 

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS
This graduate seminar is designed to engage students in a thorough analysis of the historical, literary, and theological aspects of the Gospel of Matthew, as well as an analysis of its relationship to the other Synoptic Gospels.  We will look critically at both the impact of history and social setting on this gospel and the impact of this gospel on history and social settings. In addition to making connections between historical issues and the Gospel of Matthew, we will also evaluate connections between this gospel and contemporary theological and pastoral issues.  With Matthew’s Gospel as our springboard, we will dive into the troubled waters of early Christianity in an effort to understand how these first followers of Jesus presented the “good news.”

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
 1.  Students will be able to describe, define and discuss the historical, literary and theological contexts of        the Gospel of Matthew.
 2.  Students will be able to compare/contrast the presentation of the life of Jesus in Matthew’s Gospel    with the presentations in Mark and Luke.
 3.  Students will be able to describe the impact of the Gospel of Matthew on a variety of contemporary    theological and pastoral issues.
 4.  Students will be able to carry out sound research in a critical analysis of a selected topic regarding    Matthew’s Gospel.

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND
None

REQUIRED TEXTS
 The Bible (any good modern English translation)
 Synopsis of the Four Gospels,  RSV, Rev. ed., 2010
 Senior, Donald, What Are They Saying About Matthew? Rev. exp. New York: Paulist Press, 1996.

 A commentary of your choosing from the suggested list distributed on the first day of class.

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS

In addition to weekly reading assignments, class participation, coursework includes brief weekly reflection papers, one 5-7 page synoptic analysis paper, a mid-term exam, and one 12-18 page final paper.

Level 400 THST Courses

COURSE TITLE:  Theotokos: the Virgin Mary in Dogma and Culture

COURSE NUMBER: THST 433 / CATH 498.01

SECTION TIMES/DAYS: TR 1.35 - 2.50

INSTRUCTOR: Fr Dorian Llywelyn, S.J.

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS

“Symbol or energy, the Virgin had acted as the greatest force the Western world ever felt, and had drawn man’s activities to herself more strongly than any other power, natural or supernatural, had ever done.” (Henry Adams).  Arguably the most important woman in human history, the figure of the Virgin Mary continues to fascinate, confound, and challenge. This course investigates the development of Mariology in the Catholic tradition, placing Mariology in the context of the whole of theological endeavor, including contemporary feminist and liberationist perspectives. The class also considers Orthodox veneration of the Virgin Mary, and the rediscovery of Mary in some modern Reform communities.  The rich history of Marian devotion, as evidenced in imagery and popular religiosity in a variety of historical and geo-cultural contexts, is the basis for a consideration of the Marian phenomenon as a manifestation of culture.


STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

1. Students will know the main aspects, currents, and tensions of Mariology, particularly in the Catholic tradition.
2. Students will learn to read and interpret different kinds of Mariological texts theologically and place them in relation to devotional practices in their geo-social contexts.
3. Students will understand how Marian devotion is a cultural expression, and develop their own research interests in the cultural expressions of the theology of Mary.

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND

Students who are majoring or minoring in Theological Studies.  All students should have taken at least one of: Intro to Old Testament; Intro to New Testament; History of Christianity; Roots of Catholic Christianity; Theological Foundations of Catholicism; Introduction to Christian Theology; or Narratives of Christian Faith.

REQUIRED TEXTS

Sarah Jane Boss, The Spirit of Mary
Juan Luis Bastero, Mary, Mother of the Redeemer
Jaroslav Pelikan, Mary Through the Centuries
Marina Warner, Alone of All Her Sex
Additional readings will be made available on ERes.

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS

  • Class presentations and discussions:   30%
  • Research File     10%
  • Four short research papers (aggregate):   40%
  • Final presentation and extended research paper:  20%
       

COURSE TITLE:   THST 481: Islam in the Modern World

COURSE NUMBER:   THST 481

SECTION TIMES/DAYS: Section 1: Tuesdays 7:15 to 9:45 pm

INSTRUCTOR:   Amir Hussain

COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS
This course will introduce students to the contemporary Islamic religious tradition. It will focus on the ways in which different Muslim groups have understood Islam and what it means to be Muslim. There has been a tremendous increase in interest about Islam and Muslims since the attacks on September 11, 2001. After the attacks, there was more coverage about Islam than ever before in the American news media. We will begin the course by discussing how the news media constructs reality. Then we will start our study of contemporary Islam by examining some of the relationships between “Islam” and “the Modern World”. We will start with some methodological issues: What is “Islam”? What is “the Modern World”? How can these phenomena be studied? In this section of the course we will discuss some of the major reformers of Islam in the modern world. The next section of the course will discuss feminism and its impacts on Islam and modernity. The fourth section of the course will focus on contemporary Muslim religiosity and activity outside of North America, particularly in the conflict zones of the Tenth Parallel between Muslims and Christians. The final section of the course will discuss the role of Islam in the United States and Canada. The last weeks of the course will be devoted to student seminar presentations about their research.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of this course students will 1) demonstrate that they will think both empathetically and critically about Islam and Muslims; 2) demonstrate knowledge of the cultures of the contemporary Muslim world; 3) demonstrate that they have the ability to interpret texts and other cultural phenomena (such as rituals, myths, architecture) that have religious presuppositions or implications; 4) demonstrate that they will think both empathetically and critically about conflicting religious claims; and 5) through class participation and written assignments have improved their verbal and written skills.

PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND
Theological Studies Majors or Minors only.

REQUIRED TEXTS
John L. Esposito, The Future of Islam (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010).
Eliza Griswold, The Tenth Parallel: Dispatches from the Fault Line Between Christianity and 
Islam (New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2010).
Amir Hussain, Oil and Water: Two Faiths, One God (Kelowna: CopperHouse, 2006).
 
Course Readings Distributed in Class.

COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS
It is important for each student to know at the outset that this course requires daily reading, written assignments, and a seminar presentation. Grades will be determined as follows:

  • 15% A Book Review of 5 Pages on the Esposito Book
  • 15% A Book Review of 5 Pages on the Griswold Book
  • 10% Class Participation
  • 40% A Research Paper of 15 Pages
  • 20% Seminar Presentation