Fall 2017 Course Descriptions

  • Foundations of New Testament Theology

    COURSE TITLE:  Foundations of New Testament Theology

     

    COURSE NUMBER/SECTION:   THST 6010.1

     

    TIMES/DAYS:  T 7:15-9:45 pm

     

    INSTRUCTOR:  Jeff Siker

     

    CORE AREA: n/a

     

    FLAGGED: n/a

     

    COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS

     

     

    Email professor:  Jeffrey.siker@lmu.edu

     

     

     

     

     

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

     

     

    See professor

     

     

     

     

    PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND

     

     

    See professor

     

     

     

     

    REQUIRED TEXTS

     

     

     

     

    See professor

     

     

     

     

    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS

     

  • U.S. Latino/a Theology

    COURSE TITLE: U.S. Latino/a Theology

     

    COURSE NUMBER: THST 6034

     

    SECTION TIMES/DAYS: ORANGE SATELLITE CAMPUS

     

    PROFESSOR: Cecilia González-Andrieu, Ph.D.

     

     

    COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS

    This course examines the diverse origins and theological expressions of Latino/a/Hispanic Christian communities in the U.S. with a special emphasis on the Catholic tradition.  The course develops and employs a newly developed Latino/a theological methodology to travel from the question of “why do this?” (por qué?) to the final question of “toward what goal?” (hacia qué?).  Meant to problematize and contextualize the situation of Latino/a Christianity in what today is the United States, the course aims to expose students to foundational Latino/a theological developments in tandem with urgent contemporary questions.  Students are invited to inhabit the challenges posed by a Latino/a ecclesiological focus by engaging in researching a local Latino/a community, and to develop original theological approaches to the pastoral challenges presented to the church and the nation by the many communities grouped under the term “Latino/Hispanic.”

     

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

    The student will analyze and interpret primary foundational texts to contextualize the origins of Latino/a theological reflection.

    The student will critically examine a range of theological concepts arising out of Latino/a religious practices and experiences and assess their contribution to Christian Theology.

    The student will analyze and judge pertinent contemporary issues and data.

    The student will formulate and articulate strategies to meet the challenge posed to the church by the needs and gifts of the community through their own particular area of interest (pastoral ministry, ecumenism, ethics, liturgical practices, religious education, etc.)

     

    PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND

    This course is for Theology and Pastoral Theology Majors in the Theological Studies Graduate Program. 

     

    REQUIRED TEXTS

    Daniel G. Groody, Border of Death, Valley of Life: An Immigrant Journey of Heart and Spirit, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2007. ISBN-13: 978-0742558908

    Elizondo, Virgil, The Future is Mestizo: Life Where Cultures Meet, University Press of Colorado, 2000. ISBN: 978-087-815768.

    González, Justo L. Mañana: Christian Theology from a Hispanic Perspective. Nashville : Abingdon Press, 1990. ISBN-13: 978-0687230679.

    D. Groody and G. Campese, A Promised Land, A Perilous Journey: Theological Perspectives on Migration, ISBN-13: 978-0268029739. $23.00

     

    Electronic Reader: To complement these texts, additional articles and chapters will be assigned and made available online.

    Research packet:  In order to keep the issues of the course as timely as possible, students may also be assigned a “Research Packet” online featuring cultural, current events, creative and other materials.

     

    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS

    Engagement with all course readings evidenced in active participation in class discussions. 

    Regular class attendance. 

    Field research with a local community.

    Reading: All readings and research packet materials are to be done prior to the class meeting.

    Writing and presentations: Several short papers, discussion questions prepared every week, a final research paper or project.

     

  • Psychological Foundations of Pastoral Ministry

    COURSE NUMBER:  THST 6053.1

    COURSE TITLE: PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF PASTORAL MINISTRY SECTION TIMES/DAYS:  MONDAY, 7:15 PM TO 9:45 PM

     

    COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS

    This course explores the psychological aspects of pastoral ministry, and in particular, the ministry of spiritual direction as a helping relationship.  The focus in this course is the cultivation of the communication skills needed to be an effective pastoral minister and spiritual director.  Principal topics to be covered include the following:  a generic helping process for spiritual direction, pastoral counseling, and formation in various pastoral settings; the importance of self-knowledge and personal awareness on the part of ministers; the nature of empathic understanding and its relationship to psychological and spiritual growth; basic listening skills.

     

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

    Students will demonstrate their understanding of the difference between spiritual direction, pastoral counseling and psychotherapy by describing the process of spiritual direction in facilitating spiritual development and the role of the spiritual director in that process.

     

    Students will demonstrate the skills of active listening, empathic understanding, and facilitative intervention in the helping relationship through structured classroom experiences.   

     

    Students will deepen their self-knowledge by reflecting on their personal traits, attitudes, and characteristics that relate to their effectiveness as spiritual directors and pastoral ministers

     

    PREREQUISITES/RECOMMMENDED BACKGROUND

    For those concentrating in Spiritual Direction in the Master’s in Pastoral Theology, THST 685, The Theory and Practice of Spiritual Direction, is a prerequisite for this course.

     

    REQUIRED TEXT:

    1)  A Course Reader (TO BE PURCHASED ON THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS)

    2)  Urgings of the Heart: Toward a Spirituality of Integration by Noreen Cannon and         Wilkie Au (Paulist Press, 1995).

    3)  Transforming Our Painful Emotions by Evelyn F. Whitehead and Janes D. Whitehead            (Orbis Books, 2010)

    4) How to Be an Adult: A Handbook on Psychological and Spiritual Integration by David Richo (Paulist Press,1991)

    5) Care of Mind, Care of Spirit: Psychiatric Dimensions of Spiritual Direction, by Gerald May, M.D. (Harper and Row, 1982)

     

    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATONS

     

    1) All students will be expected to do the required reading, turn in a weekly summary/personal reflection paper on that week’s assigned reading, and participate in both class discussions and structured classroom experiences.

     

    2) All students will be expected to have a weekly (30 minute taped) listening praxis outside of class and to keep a weekly journal of reflections on each experience.    Further explanation of this assignment will be given during the first class meeting.

     

    3) All students will be expected to write a final 10-page integrative

    paper that articulates their reflections and insights gained during the semester from both  cognitive and experiential aspects of the course.   

     

    4) All students will give a class presentation based on their final integrative paper.

     

    Due to the experiential nature, structure and personal participation of this course each student is expected to attend each class and to arrive on time. 

  • Foundations of Pastoral Theology

    COURSE TITLE:  Foundations of Pastoral Theology

     

    COURSE NUMBER/SECTION:   THST 6070.1

     

    TIMES/DAYS:  W 4:30-7:00

     

    INSTRUCTOR: Faculty TBD

     

    CORE AREA: n/a

     

    FLAGGED: n/a

     

    COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS

     

    TBD

     

     

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

     

     

    TBD

     

     

     

     

    PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND

     

     

    TBD

     

     

     

     

    REQUIRED TEXTS

     

     

    TBD

     

     

     

     

     

     

    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS

     

  • Spiritual Formation for Pastoral Ministry

    Title:  Spiritual Formation for Pastoral Ministry

    Course Number:  THST 6074-01

    Section Times/Days:  Monday 4:30-7 pm, University Hall 3786

    Instructor:  Dr. Brett C. Hoover

     

    Description: This course focuses on understanding and cultivating spiritual practices to maintain a holistic spirituality capable of balancing self- possession and self-transcendence, contemplation and action, self-care and the care of others in the context of pastoral ministry. The course explores spiritual practice in a variety of Christian spiritual traditions. The course will include theoretical and experiential learning, including group prayer experiences as well as critical group reflection on spiritual dilemmas and challenges that arise in the context ministry.  Students are required to be under the care of a spiritual advisor or director for the duration of the course.

     

    Student learning outcomes: Students will be able to …

    • Define and describe what spiritual practice is in the context of the Christian tradition;
    • Describe and critically consider the spiritual practices and ideas raised by different Christian spiritual traditions, placing those traditions into dialogue with at least one non-Christian tradition;
    • Make sense of their life history and contemporary life and ministry experiences in light of Christian spiritual traditions;
    • Engage in Ignatian and other forms of Christian discernment, with attention to the history of grace and sin in their own lives;
    • Formulate their own approach to spiritual practice, considering their own context and life state, and evaluating that approach in dialogue with Christian spiritual traditions. 

     

    Pre-requisites:  None.

     

    Textbooks:

    • Wilkie Au and Noreen Cannon, The Discerning Heart: Exploring the Christian Path (Mahwah, New Jersey:  Paulist Press, 2006).
    • Philip Sheldrake, Spirituality: A Guide for the Perplexed (New York: Bloomsbury, 2014).
    • Peter Tyler and Richard Woods, eds. The Bloomsbury Guide to Christian Spirituality (New York: Bloomsbury, 2012).
    • Claire E. Wolfteich, American Catholics Through the Twentieth Century: Spirituality, Lay Experience, and Public Life (New York: Crossroad, 2011).

     

    Work expectations:

    Expectations for this class include journal entries, a scaffolded spirituality portfolio including critical analysis of a spiritual practice, research on a particular tradition of Christian spirituality in dialogue with a non-Christian tradition, and autobiographical reflection in the light of Christian spiritual traditions.   All students must be engaged in spiritual advising or direction.

  • Comparative Mysticism

    COURSE TITLE: Comparative Mysticism 

     

    COURSE NUMBER/SECTION:   THST 6082  /  YGST 6082

     

    TIMES/DAYS:  Mondays, 4:30 to 7 p.m.

     

    INSTRUCTOR: Christopher Key Chapple, Doshi Professor of Indic and Comparative Theology

     

    CORE AREA: Graduate Only

     

    FLAGGED: Graduate Only

     

    COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS

    In this class we will explore the inner or mystical life as articulated in the life and practice of

    various religious traditions.  We will begin with a study of a modern classic: The Varieties of

    Religious Experience by William James, the pre-eminent American philosopher and psychologist

    as well as the key ideas of Carl Jung.  We will then examine the Jewish and Islamic mystical

    traditions, as well as key writers in the emerging field of contemplative Christian ecology.  Yoga

    and mysticism will be examined through the writings of 20th century philosopher Sri Aurobindo. 

     

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

    Students will be familiar with the psychological approaches to religious experience as found in William James and Carl Jung.  Students will learn the principles and practices of mystical theology from the Jewish, Muslim, Christian, and Yoga traditions.  They will be versant with primary figures. They will also be able to write about and discuss this topic.

    PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND: Graduate status

     

    REQUIRED TEXTS

     

    William James, Varieties of Religious Experience

    Joseph Campbell, ed., The Portable Jung

    Douglas Christie, The Blue Sapphire of the Mind

    Thomas Berry, Evening Thoughts

    Chapple, ed., Antonio deNicolas: Poet of Eternal Return

    Anne Marie Schimmel, Mystical Dimensions of Islam

    Debashish Banerji, Seven Quartets of Becoming: A Transformative Yoga Psychology Based on the Diaries of Sri Aurobindo

     

    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS

    Students will be required to complete two projects.  The first will be a summary paper and presentation based on a portion of one of the books listed above.  This will provide students with an opportunity to summarize a segment of an assigned text and present its main ideas succinctly.  The second project will be a research project pertaining to mysticism and/or spirituality, particularly in its relationship to one or more specific theological traditions.  Suggested topics might include the life and work of various individual mystics (Rumi, Kabir, Lalla, Hildegard of Bingen, George Fox, Al-Junayd, Patanjali, etc.) or a study of the general philosophical and theological issues that surround the study of mysticism, drawing from literature by contemporary writers such as Nasr, Katz, Stace, Underhill, and others.  This paper must be thoroughly researched with at least seven print sources.  It must be a minimum of fifteen pages, double spaced.  It must in some way draw conceptually from the course material. 

     

  • Graduate Pro-Seminar

    Title:  Graduate Pro-seminar

    Course Number:  THST 6090-01

    Section Times/Days:  Tuesday 4:30-7 pm, University Hall 3230

    Instructor:  Dr. Brett C. Hoover

     

    Course Description:  Christian theology is disciplined reasoning through the questions raised by human beings as a result of their relationship with God in Jesus Christ.  Studying theology is neither catechesis (formation in Christian faith) nor apologetics (defending Christian faith).  It means joining an ongoing historical dialogue (occasionally an argument) that Christians call tradition, analyzing and critiquing how and why diverse Christians from the past and present have expressed their relationship to God as they have, but also continuing to seek adequate ways to do so today.  This course will also explore some of the foundations of religious studies, that is, the discipline that considers religious traditions irrespective of one’s personal faith commitments.  In short, the proseminar course prepares students for further graduate study in Theological Studies.  It introduces some of the vocabulary, background knowledge, methodologies, and skills necessary for such study, including theological reading, research, and writing.  The seminar includes input and exercises that will expose students to the basic subfields of theology (including biblical studies, historical theology, ethics, systematic or constructive theology, pastoral theology, liturgy, spirituality, and comparative theology).  Students will explore methodological questions and procedures appropriate to each. 

     

    Student Learning Outcomes:

    Students will be able to…

    • Say what Christian theology is;
    • Demonstrate that they know and can make use of the foundational mechanics of theological study at the graduate level (critical theological reading and writing, research, and citation);
    • Understand theological arguments, offering analysis and critique, learning to make their own theological arguments;
    • Define and use the disciplinary vocabulary of Christian theology and religious studies;
    • Understand and make critical use of theological methodologies from different sub-disciplines of Christian theology;
    • Describe how theological ideas, practices, and methodologies occur in response to the questions and challenges of different historical eras and different cultures. 

     

    Pre-requisites:  None

     

    Required Texts:

    • Gonzalez, Justo.  Mañana: Christian Theology from the Hispanic Perspective. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1990.
    • McFarland, Ian A. et al, eds. The Cambridge Dictionary of Christian Theology.  New York : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
    • McGrath, Alister.  The Christian Theology Reader, 5th edition.  Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2017.
    • Rausch, Thomas.  I Believe in God: A Reflection on The Apostles Creed.  Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2008.
    • Yaghjian, Lucretia B.  Writing Theology Well: A Rhetoric for Theological and Biblical Writers (New York: Continuum, 2006). 

     

    Course Work:

    Expectations for this class include argument summary papers, glossary contributions, reading response blog, oral presentations in class, midterm and final examinations. 

  • Comprehensive Exam Seminar

    COURSE TITLE: Comprehensive Exam Seminar         

     

    COURSE NUMBER: THST 6092.01

     

    SECTION TIMES/DAYS: Tuesdays 4:30pm-7:00pm

     

    INSTRUCTOR: Tiemeier

     

    CORE AREA: N/A

     

    FLAGGED: N/A

     

    COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS

     

    This is the required comprehensive exam seminar for all MA in Theology students. While drawing on students’ previous course work, the seminar also requires students to study additional sources that will help them integrate their theological education and provide a foundation for their research projects. The comprehensive exams are administered as a part of the course requirements.

     

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

     

    Review and assess major Christian thinkers

    Articulate and analyze major theological themes

    Construct theological arguments

    Integrate theological studies

     

    PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND

     

    36 units of course work completed.

    Students with at least 30 units may petition the Graduate Curriculum Committee for permission to enroll.

     

    REQUIRED TEXTS

     

    Athanasius, On the Incarnation

    Augustine, De Trinitate

    Anselm, Cur Deus Homo

    Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologiae (Prima Pars)

    John Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion (Book One)

    Karl Rahner, Foundations of Christian Faith

    Gustavo Gutiérrez, A Theology of Liberation

    Elizabeth Johnson, She Who Is

    Peter Phan, Being Religious Interreligiously: Asian Perspectives on Interfaith Dialogue

    M. Shawn Copeland, Enfleshing Freedom: Body, Race, and Being

     

    Additional books chosen in consultation with the instructor.

     

    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS

    1. Seminar Discussion and Presentations (Oral examination occurs in class)

    2. One general exam in theology (10 page take-home exam)

    3. One disciplinary exam in theological studies (Chosen in consultation with the instructor--e.g., biblical theology, spirituality, history of religions, liturgy, ethics, comparative theology, historical theology, philosophy of religion, faith and culture, moral theology, ritual studies, etc. (10 page take-home exam)

    4. One research proposal (10 page proposal of research seminar project)

  • Introduction to Bioethics

    COURSE TITLE:  Introduction to Bioethics

     

    COURSE NUMBER/SECTION:   THST 6998.1

     

    TIMES/DAYS:  M 7:15-9:45 pm

     

    INSTRUCTOR:  Roberto Dell’Oro

     

    CORE AREA: n/a

     

    FLAGGED: n/a

     

    COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS

     

     

    Email professor:  Roberto.dell’oro@lmu.edu

     

     

     

     

     

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

     

     

    See professor

     

     

     

     

    PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND

     

     

    See professor

     

     

     

     

    REQUIRED TEXTS

     

     

     

     

    See professor

     

     

     

     

    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS

  • Bioethics at the Beginning of Life

    COURSE TITLE:  Bioethics at the Beginning of Life

     

    COURSE NUMBER/SECTION:   THST 6998.2

     

    TIMES/DAYS:  T 7:15-9:45 pm

     

    INSTRUCTOR:  TBD

     

    CORE AREA: n/a

     

    FLAGGED: n/a

     

    COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS

     

     

    TBD

     

     

     

     

     

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    PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND

     

     

     

     

     

     

    REQUIRED TEXTS

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS

     

  • Catholicity in the 21st Century

    COURSE TITLE:  Catholicity in the 21st Century

     

    COURSE NUMBER/SECTION:   THST 6998.4

     

    TIMES/DAYS:  W 7:15-9:45 pm

     

    INSTRUCTOR:  Karen Enriquez

     

    CORE AREA: n/a

     

    FLAGGED: n/a

     

    COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS

     

     

    Email professor:  Karen.enriquez@lmu.edu  

     

     

     

     

     

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

     

     

    See professor

     

     

     

     

    PREREQUISITES/RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND

     

     

    See professor

     

     

     

     

    REQUIRED TEXTS

     

     

     

     

    See professor

     

     

     

     

    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS

  • Foundations of Theological Ethics

    COURSE TITLE:  Foundations of Theological Ethics

     

    COURSE NUMBER/SECTION:   THST 6998.5

     

    TIMES/DAYS:  W 7:15-9:45 pm

     

    INSTRUCTOR:  TBD

     

    CORE AREA: n/a

     

    FLAGGED: n/a

     

    COURSE DESCRIPTION/PRINCIPAL TOPICS

     

     

    TBD

     

     

     

     

     

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    REQUIRED TEXTS

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    COURSE WORK/EXPECTATIONS