Dr. Gil P. Klein

   
Assistant Professor of Theological Studies
Department of Theological Studies
Loyola Marymount University
1 LMU Drive, Suite 3700
Los Angeles, CA 90045-2659, USA
gil.klein@lmu.edu
   

Academic Background

B.Arch., Bezalel Academy, 1998;

M. Phil., Cambridge University, 2003;

Ph.D., Cambridge University, 2007

 

Areas of Research

Dr. Klein specializes in the study of late antique rabbinic Judaism in correspondence with the discipline of architectural history and theory.

 

Courses Taught

  • FFYS 1000 - The Holy Land and Jerusalem:  a Religious History
  • THST 1000 - The Hebrew bible/Old Testament:  Theology, History, Interpretation
  • THST 3100 - Judaism:  Religion, History and Culture
  • THST 3751 - Sacred Place [also taught on the 4000 level]
  • THST 616 - Jewish-Christian Relations:  Theology and History

 

Selected Publications

[Book in preparation] Architecture and Argument: Rabbinic Spatial Politics in the Late Antique City.   

“Squaring the City: Between Roman and Rabbinic Urban Geometry”, in Phenomenologies of the City: Studies in the History and Philosophy of Architecture, eds. Henriette Steiner and Maximilian Sternberg, Farnham, UK and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2015. 34-48.

“Spatial Struggle: Intercity Relations and the Topography of Intra-Rabbinic Competition”, in Religious Competition in the Third Century CE: Jews, Christians, and the Greco-Roman World, eds. Jordan D. Rosenblum, Lily C. Vuong, and Nathaniel P. DesRosiers, Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2014. 153-167.

“Torah in triclinia: the Rabbinic Banquet and the Significance of Architecture”, Jewish Quarterly Review,Vol. 102, No. 3 (2012) 325-370.

“Non-canonical Towns: Representation of Urban Paradigms in Talmudic Understanding of the Jewish city”, Studia Rosenthaliana 40 (2007-2008) 231-263.

“Oral Towns: Rabbinic Discourse and the Understanding of the Late Antique Jewish City”, in Imagining the Cityvol. 2: The Politics of Urban Space, edited by Christian Emden, Catherine Keen and David Midgley, Bern and Oxford: Peter Lang, 2006. 27-48.

“The Topography of Symbol: Between Late Antique and Modern Jewish Understanding of Cities”, Zeitschrift für Religions und Geistesgeschichte 58, 1 (2006) 16-28.

 

Personal Website