The 2006 Bellarmine Forum will begin with a pre-forum event on the evening of Sunday, October 29. A Missa Gaia , or "mass for the earth" will be held in Sacred Heart Chapel with the theme, "Remember your Mother." The Forum will conclude on Friday, November 3, with an afternoon event. There will be four sessions on each day, except for Tuesday, October 31 – which have three sessions - and Friday, November 3 – which will have two sessions. The first session will be held in the morning (tentatively 9:25 am on Tuesday and Thursday; 10 am on Monday, Wednesday and Friday). The second session will be held after lunch (tentatively 1 pm on Monday, Wednesday and Friday and 1:35 pm on Tuesday and Thursday; the third session will begin at 3 pm and the fourth session at 7:30 pm on Monday, Wednesday and Thursday).

Tentative Schedule:


Sunday, October 29
Remember your Mother

8-9 pm
Sacred Heart Chapel
Missa Gaia ("Earth Mass")
The Missa Gaia , or Earth Mass, is a contemporary worship service that integrates world music with recorded sounds such as the calls of wolves, whales, eagles and seals. It celebrates the whole earth as a sacred space. The first Missa Gaia was celebrated in honor of Mother Earth on Mother’s Day, May 10, 1981. The unique and mesmerizing music is by Paul Winter, award-winning saxophonist, bandleader, composer and founder of Living Music and the Paul Winter Consort. Motivated by the vision of a musical-ecological community, Winter has developed his unique "Earth Music." Come experience this unforgettable ceremony performed by John Coleman, S.J., John Flaherty, director of music and liturgy, and Campus Ministry.
  • Celebrant: John Coleman, S.J., Casassa Chair of Social Values, LMU
Hear the podcast now!

 

 

Monday, October 30
Tick. Tick.
President George W. Bush has recently conceded that we’re “addicted to oil,” and if so, the path to recovery--as every addict knows--begins with the intervention that reveals the true cost of his life for himself and others. Taking an inventory can be upsetting, but it’s the only way to start an honest assessment of the task that is set before us.

10-11:50 am
Hilton 100

Redesigning Our Future
Jean-Michel Cousteau’s message focuses on sustainability. He draws upon his experiences to communicate his love--and his concern--for the earth’s water and the ecosystem it nourishes, and he offers an enlightened perspective on the challenges facing this threatened ecosystem.

Following in the footsteps of his famous father, Jean-Michel Cousteau has spent his life exploring the world’s oceans aboard the research vessels Calypso and Alcyone. Through his stewardship of the sea, he recognizes the interdependence of our lives with the world’s oceans. Cousteau is an explorer, environmentalist, educator and film producer, was executive vice president of The Cousteau Society for nearly 20 years, and is founder and president of Ocean Futures Society.

Ocean Futures Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to exploring and researching our global ocean, inspiring and educating people throughout the world to act responsibly for its protection, documenting the critical connection between humanity and nature, and celebrating the ocean’s vital importance to the survival of all life on our planet.

Dr. Jerry R. Schubel joined the Aquarium of the Pacific as president and CEO in June 2002.  Schubel serves on a number of national commissions, committees, and boards.  He is President Emeritus at the New England Aquarium where he served from 1994 to 2001.  Dr. Schubel was dean and director of the State University of New York at Stony Brook's Marine Sciences Research Center from 1974 to 1994.

The Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, California, cares for more than 12,500 ocean animals in more than 50 exhibits.  Each year 1.3 million visitors gain a sense of wonder, respect, and stewardship for the Pacific Ocean, its inhabitants, and ecosystems.  In 2005, the Aquarium served 238,000 student and teachers with environmental and marine education classes and tours at the Aquarium and through its outreach program Aquarium on Wheels.  The Marine Conservation Research Institute, as a division of the Aquarium, brings together scientists, business leaders, and other interested parties in forums, classes, and workshops to identify and explore alternatives for dealing with complex multidisciplinary environmental issues.

Hear the podcast now!



1-2:50 pm
Hilton 100

Panel: Environmental Justice and Public Health
What is the impact of environmentally irresponsible acts upon public health? To what extent are members of poor and/or marginalized communities vulnerable to such acts? This panel will address the issues of environmental justice and public health.

Bhatia is director of San Francisco Department of Public Health’s recently created Health Inequities Research Unit and is a member of the Health and Social Justice Committee for the National Association of County and City Health Officials. His experience reflects his expertise in medicine, epidemiology, environmental policy and decision-making.

Julie Chavez Rodríguez is the granddaughter of César Chavez and has been an activist since her childhood, when she was arrested at a protest at the age of 10. She will address the issue of environmental justice from the perspective of how pesticides affect farm workers.

Eveline Shen is executive director of ACRJ, organizes low-income communities of color around issues of social and environmental justice.

  • Moderator: Cheryl Grills, Psychology Dept., LMU
  • Julie Chavez Rodriguez, Activist, Cesar Chavez Foundation
  • Rajiv Bhatia, Director of Occupational and Environmental Health, San Francisco
  • Eveline Shen, MPH, Asian Community for Reproductive Justice
Hear the podcast now!


3-5 pm
Hilton 100

Film Screening - Endangered Species
“Endangered Species” (90 min), produced and directed by Robert H. Nixon, is the story of marginalized youth striving to return our nation’s bird, the bald eagle, to Washington D.C. This group of young people, living near the Anacostia River, is struggling to overcome the personal challenges they face while making a difference.

Nixon is founder and chairman of the Earth Conservation Corps, a non-profit organization founded in 1989 as a White House domestic policy initiative. It provides hands-on education, environmental training, professional experience, and leadership skills for disadvantaged youth between the ages of 17 and 25. As Corps members improve their own lives, they rebuild the environmental, social and economic health of their communities.

Max Kennedy founded the Urban Ecology Institute at Boston College in 1998. The UEI studies the emerging field of urban ecology and provides information to urban residents and policymakers on natural resources and taking action to protect them. Scientists, educators and attorneys work with middle and high school youth to improve science and civic education, and to protect and transform natural resources before they are lost forever.

  • Max Kennedy, Urban Ecology Institute, Boston College
  • Robert H. Nixon, Earth Conservations Corp.
  • Glenn O'Gilvie, Earth Conservation Corp.
Hear the podcast now!
7:30-9 pm
Hilton 100

Environmental Responsibility in Practice
Alpinism is the heart of Patagonia, but environmental activism is what makes it tick. The rugged-wear business, founded in 1973, has grown into a worldwide company that makes clothing and gear for skiing, snowboarding, surfing, fly fishing, paddling, trail running and climbing. All of these are silent, human-powered sports that bring the person closer to nature.

At Patagonia, the belief is that a love of wild and beautiful places demands participation in the fight to save them. This is why Patagonia was the first U.S. company to print its catalogue on recycled paper (1984) and the first to make fleece jackets using recycled plastic bottles (1993). Yvon Chouinard, Patagonia’s founder, donates 30 percent of his annual salary to environmental organizations. In 2001 he co-founded 1% for the Planet, an alliance of companies committed to paying an “Earth Tax” to environmental groups.

Chouinard founded the outdoor-clothing company based on his own love for the outdoors. He is a self-trained blacksmith who, at age 19, invented a piton to scale rock faces that holds better, can be reused, and is now the world’s standard. Chouinard is a world-class mountaineer, dedicated fly fisher and diehard surfer. His story about running a pioneering, eco-friendly and profitable company can be found in his 2005 book, “Let My People Go Surfing.”

By keeping up the quality of its products, Patagonia, a $230 million dollar company, has stayed profitable without losing its soul. Patagonia is a perfect example of a large business that is both successful and environmentally responsible.

Chouinard’s speech at LMU will focus on the importance of following your personal passion and will inspire young entrepreneurs on the value of green business.
Hear the podcast now!

 

 

 

Tuesday, October 31
Please Respond
Addressing the environmental crisis will demand the courage of great convictions: shortsighted decisions got us here, and only far-sighted solutions will see us through the other side. Today we connect the obligation to care for creation with the deepest sources of human action—religious traditions, spiritual practices and the modern ethical perspectives that draw people to common action across confessional lines.

9:25-10:40 am
UHall 1000
Panel: World Religions: Ecological Awareness & Activism
The world's religious traditions can make an important contribution toward raising global consciousness about environmental issues. By examining faith, ethics, and practice, guidelines may be ascertained to help people make informed decisions about lifestyle choices that can help the human community move toward ecological balance. In this panel discussion, perspectives on Jewish, Christian, Islamic and Yogic environmentalism will be shared by activists and scholars. 

Alethea Abuyuan, of USC's Center for Religion and Civic Culture, recently completed her doctoral dissertation on faith-based organizations and environmental management. 

Laura Cornell, founder of the Green Yoga Association, has written and lectured extensively on the topic of how the ideas and practices of Yoga can help enhance ecological awareness. 

Michael Cunningham, of the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles, works at the "Greening" of churches in the Los Angeles area and beyond, and brings environmental education to parishioners.

Amir Hussain, associate professor of Theological Studies at LMU, recently published the book “Oil and Water: Two Faiths, One God,” which serves as exploration of the hope for reconciliation between Islam and Christianity today. 

Lee Wallach is president of the Coalition on the Environment and Jewish Life of Southern California (CoejlSC). He is also on the board of the Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters.
  • Moderator: Christopher Chapple, Theological Studies, LMU
  • Alethea Abuyuan, USC Center for Religion and Civic Culture
  • Laura Cornell, Green Yoga Association
  • Michael Cunningham, Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles
  • Amir Hussain, PhD, Theological Studies, LMU
  • Lee Wallach, Coalition on the Environment and Jewish Life of Southern California
Hear the podcast now!



12:05 - 2 pm
Alumni Mall
Career Development Services - Graduate Studies Fair
Every year CDS hosts a graduate school fair on the LMU campus to connect undergraduate students with different graduate programs at LMU and throughout the United States. Representatives from schools of medicine, law, veterinary, and business will be on campus to share information, answer questions about the application process, school criteria, academic courses, and to distribute brochures and applications.

This year, a directory of graduate programs focusing on environmental studies will be available at the graduate school fair. A wide range of programs are included in the directory including those offering graduate programs in Environmental Science and Engineering, Environmental Education, Natural Resources and Environmental Studies.

12:15-1:25 pm
St. Roberts Auditorium

Keynote: Catholic Vision and Ecology
Mary Evelyn Tucker is a leading Catholic academic, researcher and spokesperson on religion and ecology. She focuses on the need for world’s religions to move from their theological and anthropological phase into their ecological and cosmological phase and become significant partners in identifying an ethical vision for sustainable life on the planet. “As the world’s religions suggest, our response to the earth is one of continued gratitude for the gift of life,” says Tucker.
 
Tucker is co-founder of The Forum on Religion and Ecology, the largest international multireligious project of its kind. With conferences, publications and a website, it is engaged in exploring religious worldviews, texts, and ethics in order to broaden understanding of the complex nature of current environmental concerns.

Currently visiting professor at Yale University, and research associate at the Harvard Yenching Institute, Tucker is author and/or co-editor of several books including "Worldly Wonder: Religions Enter Their Ecological Phase," and "Religion and Ecology: Can the Climate Change?" Tucker is also a member of the Interfaith Partnership for the Environment at the United Nations Environment Programme and vice President of the American Teilhard Association.  She was a member of the Earth Charter Drafting Committee and is currently a member of the Earth Charter International Council.

Hear the podcast now!



1:35-2:50 pm
St. Roberts Auditorium
Sacred Geography and Sanctuaries of the Spirit
This panel will provide different perspectives on the role of spirituality and the environment, including the role of memory, ritual, history and place in the broader Native American community.

Paul Ojibway is a Franciscan Friar of Atonement. He is former director of LMU’s American Indian programs and the Native American Ministry of the Los Angeles archdiocese. Ojibway has been an important cultural bridge between the Catholic Church and the Native American community in California and in the United States.
  • Speakers: Paul Ojibway, S.A., Church of Santa Maria
  • Moderator: Douglas Burton-Christie, PhD., Moderator, Theological Studies, LMU
  • Angie Dorame Behrns, Gabrielino Tongva Springs Foundation
  • James Lockman, O.F.M., Missions San Louis Rey
Hear the podcast now!


3-5 pm
UHall 1000
Moral Vision, Ethics, and Practice
This panel will address the non-religious, secular resources in ethics and moral vision underpinning environmental responsibility. LMU is a Catholic university that supports religious visions, but also looks to ethics as one of the main disciplines. LMU has established six ethics chairs across campus in its various schools and colleges, three of whom will participate in this panel discussion.

Philip J. Chmielewski is the first holder of the Sir Thomas More Chair of Engineering Ethics within the Frank R. Seaver College of Science and Engineering. Along with his colleagues, he develops courses, modules and programs that contribute to the education of informed and responsible professional engineers.

Thomas White is the Conrad N. Hilton Chair in Business Ethics and Director of the Center for Ethics and Business.  Professor White is also a Scientific Advisor to the Wild Dolphin Project and author of the forthcoming In Defense of Dolphins: The New Moral Frontier.

John Coleman, S.J., specializes in the sociology of religion and is holder of the Casassa Chair of Social Values at LMU. He is also one of the co-organizers of this year’s Bellarmine Forum.
  • Moderator: John Coleman, SJ, Casassa Chair of Social Values, Moderator
  • Thomas White, Hilton Chair of Business Ethics, LMU
  • Philip Chmielewski, SJ, Sir Thomas More Chair of Engineering Ethics, LMU





 

 

Wednesday, November 1
It All Adds Up
Must environmental and economic perspectives conflict? This has appeared a truism since the beginnings of the modern environmental movement, which appeared to demand the frustration of economic goals for the sake of non-economic—aesthetic or ethical—ends. The last twenty years have seen a revolution, however, as environmentally-inclined economists and entrepreneurs have asked us to look again at the true costs of environmental irresponsibility—and the potential profits that good stewards may achieve in an era of economic transformation.

 

9am-4 pm,
UHall Atrium
Green Expo
Businesses that feature environmentally friendly products, processes and/or practices will have booths set up throughout the 1st floor of University Hall. Learn about companies that "walk the talk" of environmental responsibility and find out more about how they "make money green."

Local non-profit organizations that focus on environmental issues, including environmental justice, environmental health and environmentally responsible practices, will offer information, internships and insight. Come check out the people and organizations in Los Angeles who are making a difference. We invite you to consider how you can get involved and make a difference too.

10-11:50 am
UHall 1000
Environmental Economics 101
Having shown why the conflict between economic and environmental imperatives always has appeared inevitable, economist Stephan Kroll will reveal how new, clearer thinking over the last thirty years has produced the revolutionary discipline of environmental economics—a field now opening dramatic new perspectives on the real economic costs of environmental ignorance. The economic landscape is changing in ways that traditionally-trained bankers, insurers, financiers and entrepreneurs can no longer afford to ignore.

Kroll joined CSU Sacramento’s Department of Economics in 2003. His particular interest is in the behavioral and institutional underpinnings of environmental policies, in theory and in experiments. Courses Kroll teaches include Environmental Economics, Economics for Environmentalists and Experimental Economics.
  • Stephan Kroll, PhD, CSU Sacramento

Hear the podcast now!



11 am - 12:15 pm
 UHall 4th Floor Atrium (off UHall Bridge)
Student Poster Presentation

LMU students will present the results of their research on a variety of environmental topics. The work includes contaminant and ecological studies in the Ballona Wetlands, development of environmental science curricula for the Ballona Discovery Center, and biochemical speciation of bacteria from wetland water samples. The research was done under the guidance of LMU faculty members.

 

1-2:50 pm
UHall 1000
Strategies for Environmental Protection: Governmental, Legal and Private
This panel will look at strategies to protect the environment from three different perspectives: those of private citizens, public interest groups, and government.
Peter Greenwald is senior policy advisor for the South Coast Air Quality Management District, the air pollution control agency for Orange County and urban portions of Los Angeles, Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Greenwald has more than 20 years experience in air quality law and policy and is involved in improving air quality for the Los Angeles Basin.

Duncan McFetridge is president and founder of Save Our Forests and Ranchlands. SOFAR is committed to defending the San Diego backcountry against urban sprawl and working toward the adoption and implementation of a plan to preserve rural resources.

Jonathan Parfrey is executive director of Physicians for Social Responsibility in Los Angeles. PSR-LA brings together health professionals and the diverse communities of Southern California to reduce threats to public health related to war, environmental toxins, and gun violence.

Joel Reynolds joined the National Resources Defense Council’s Los Angeles office as a senior attorney in 1990. He is director of the Marine Mammal Protection and Southern California Ecosystem projects and co-director of NRDC’s Urban Program. NRDC uses law, science and the support of 1.2 million members to protect the planet’s wildlife and wild places and to insure a safe and healthy environment for all living things.
  • Moderator: Daniel P. Selmi, JD, Loyola Law School
  • Peter Greenwald, South Coast Air Quality Management District
  • Duncan McFetridge, Save Our Forests and Ranchlands
  • Jonathan Parfrey, Physicians for Social Responsibility
  • Joel Reynolds, JD, Natural Resources Defense Council
Hear the podcast now!


3-5 pm
UHall 1000
Environmentally Responsible Business Success Stories
Participants in this panel represent organizations that set standards when it comes to sustainability and break records when it comes to profitability, proving that a company can be green and successful. Making money and being environmentally friendly do mix.

Michael Gibbs is senior vice president at ICF International, founded in 1969 as Inner City Fund. ICF International is now a global professional services firm that partners with government and commercial clients to deliver consulting services and technology solutions in defense, energy, environment, homeland security, social programs and transportation.
Adam Lowry is co-founder of Method Products, Inc., a consumer products company with the goal of transforming household cleaners from toxic objects that hide under the sink to all-natural, biodegradable, and stylish countertop accessories. 

Bharat Patel is principal and sustainability expert at DMJM, an award-winning architecture and interiors projects firm. DMJM is working with the U.S. Green Building Council to develop national guidelines for sustainable development on university campuses and obtain LEED certification on projects for private and public sector clients.

Judy Pike is the director of sustainability at Bentley Prince Street, an industry leader in the movement toward sustainable commerce. As a manufacturer of award-winning broadloom and carpet tile products, all of which have the Environmentally Preferable Product (EPP) Certification, Bentley Prince Street is continually searching for improvements to compete in a more environmentally aware marketplace.

Moderating this panel is Diane Wittenberg, president of the California Climate Action Registry. Recipient of the Clean Air Citizen Award, recognized for her efforts to launch an electric vehicle industry, and leader for 15 years at Edison International, Wittenberg is a force for nature.
Hear the podcast now!



7:15-8:45 pm
Gersten Pavilion
Crimes Against Nature
Hollywood is one of the world’s most influential places when it comes to the planet’s zeitgeist, and the environmental movement has the perfect spokesperson here in Tinseltown: Laurie David, producer and spouse of comedian Larry David. She holds eco-salons in her home to educate Hollywood movers and shakers such as Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Hanks on global warming. She has raised millions of dollars for green organizations and founded Stop Global Warming, a nonpolitical group that pressures Washington into taking decisive action. She became an activist in 1999 after meeting Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.

As author of “Crimes Against Nature,” Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., is one of the nation’s most outspoken environmentalists. Over two decades he’s helped safeguard the ecological integrity of the Hudson River as chief prosecuting attorney for RiverKeeper, has fought for commercial fishermen, gone after polluters, and waged war over the safety of the Indian Point nuclear power plant. Following in his family’s footsteps, Kennedy is well one his way to a place in the pantheon of America’s great public leaders.

Hear the podcast now!


9-10 pm
Gersten Pavillion

Film Screening - Too Hot Not to Handle 
Heat waves, melting glaciers, rising sea levels, catastrophic storms, migrating viruses, population displacement: over the past 100 years, the profligate consumption of fossil fuels, especially in developed nations, has contributed to a dangerous warming of the earth that is already impacting the way we live. The cautionary documentary “Too Hot Not to Handle” (53 min) foreshadows the alarming effects of global warming. "My personal hope is that every viewer will be inspired to become part of the solution to reducing our carbon emissions," says the film’s executive producer Laurie David.

 

 

 

Thursday, November 2
Clean Your Room
Like many other movements for social change, effective environmental initiatives demand that we “think globally” but “act locally.” Los Angeles, like every other major city, faces huge challenges posed by transportation, water treatment, and waste management—and worse, a history of having imposed the burdens very unevenly among its citizens. What has been done, what is being done, and what can be done to take responsibility for these issues in ways that are just for all?

 

6:30am-1:30 pm Dance Performance: Groundswell: A site-specific dance for the Ballona Freshwater Marsh
A truly unique experience, this outdoor performance, created by choreographer Kristen Smiarowski in collaboration with composer Robert Een, draws attention through dance and music to the unique geography and habitat of the freshwater marsh, a 26-acre site in the Ballona Wetlands, located just west of LMU. The marsh’s rich history raises a complex set of ecological, political and economic issues. The performance creates layers of images that illuminate the underlying tensions between human and environmental needs.

Audiences will be shuttled from LMU to the marsh where they will travel on foot to different locations to view the performance. The total duration, including roundtrip transportation, is one hour and 15 minutes. The entire performance is outdoors, so dress accordingly. Four performances will be offered. Space is limited and reservations are strongly recommended. Call 310.338.2716 or email bellarmineforum@lmu.edu.
  • Choreographer: Kristen Smiarowski, Dance, LMU
  • Composer: Robert Een
  • Performers: LMU students and guest performers from the Los Angeles Community
  • Hosts: Edith Read, PhD, Ballona Freshwater Marsh; James Landry, PhD, Natural Science, LMU
Shuttle pickup in front of UHall at the following times:

6:30 am
9:25 am
10:50 am
12:15 pm
9:25-10:45 am
UHall 1000
The Future of Transportation in L.A.
You can’t have a conversation with an Angeleno without bringing up traffic. Whether you are comparing commutes, complaining about the 24/7 traffic jams on the 405, the 101 and the 710, criticizing the lack of mass transportation, or bad-mouthing the smog, traffic is the city’s great equalizer. No one can escape from it. This panel will discuss the current situation of L.A.’s transportation and offer some possible solutions its future.

Dan Beal is manager of public policy and programs for the Automobile Club of Southern California.

Gloria Jeff is director of the L.A. Department of Transportation whose goal is to keep Los Angeles moving by using technology, securing new funds and coordinating with city departments.

Bill Reinert is the national manager, Advanced Technology Group, at Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A Group. He is responsible for the long-range product planning of all alternative fuel Toyota vehicles including hybrid, fuel cell and electric vehicles.
  • Dan Beal, Automobile Club of Southern California
  • Gloria Jeff, Los Angeles Department of Transportation
  • Bill Reinert, Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A Group
  • Moderator: Lambert Doezema, PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, LMU
Hear the podcast now!


1:35-2:50 pm
UHall 1000
Water in Los Angeles:  Managing a Precious Resource
This panel will look at how water is managed in Los Angeles, including its sources, use and fate. The discussion also will focus on how we can move towards a more sustainable use of water, both at the policy and individual levels.

Gerald Gewe was a former manager at the City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. During his time with DWP, he focused on potable water as well as water reuse issues for the Los Angeles area.

Andy Lipkis founded TreePeople in 1973 at the age of 15. This non-profit organization seeks to inspire the people of Los Angeles to take personal responsibility for the urban forest by offering a variety of forestry and environmental education programs, training and support.

Frances Spivey-Weber is executive director of the Mono Lake Committee, dedicated to protecting and restoring Mono Lake. This ecosystem and it’s surrounding basin is one of California’s richest natural areas and is home to one thousand plant species, 14 ecological zones and 400 vertebrate species.
  • Gerald Gewe, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power
  • Andy Lipkis, TreePeople
  • Frances Spivy-Weber, Mono Lake Committee
  • Moderator: John Dorsey, PhD, Natural Science, LMU

References for comments from Frances Spivy-Weber  (Frances.Weber@gmail.com)

1. "Working Out an Environmental Ethic:  Anniversary Lessons from Mono Lake" by Craig Anthony (Tony) Arnold, Wyoming Law Review,  Vol. 4, No. 1, 2004, University of Wyoming College of Law.

2. California Water Plan, A Framework for Action Highlights and Volume 2, California Department of Water Resources Bulletin 160-05, December 2005.

Hear the podcast now!



3-5 pm
UHall 1000
Talking Trash at LMU: An Analysis of, and Recommendations for Better Solid Waste Management
As part of the Environmental Science (NTLS 301) course at LMU, students study the composition and fate of the solid waste stream produced by LMU. Having interviewed key personnel involved in environmental waste management both on and off campus, students will make recommendations to enable LMU to become more sustainable.
  • Panelists: Students from the Environmental Science (NTLS 301) course, LMU
  • Moderators: John Dorsey, PhD, Natural Science, LMU; James Landry, PhD, Natural Science, LMU
Hear the podcast now!



7:15-9 pm
St. Roberts Auditorium
Green but NIMBY: Unequal Burdens in L.A. Communities
“Not In My Backyard” (NIMBY) is a familiar refrain heard by policymakers trying to make a difference. What does it mean to be environmentally responsible without contributing to environmental racism? How is it that the disproportionate share of the burden for environmentally irresponsible acts falls upon marginalized and vulnerable communities? This panel features individuals intimately familiar with L.A. communities, as well as the broader environmental practices and policies that affect them.

As director of L.A. City’s Department of Environmental Affairs, Detrich Allen is in a unique position to reflect on how our practices in Los Angeles have lived up to the ideal set in 1996. That year, the L.A. City Council committed itself to assuring the fair treatment of people of all races, cultures, incomes and education levels with respect to the development, implementation and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations, and policies. 

LAUSD’s director of environmental health and safety, Angelo J. Bellomo, has worked in the environmental health field for more than 25 years. He has managed regulatory programs for site remediation, chemical emergency response and enforcement.

The Southern California director of Communities for a Better Environment, Carlos Porras, uses GIS technology to reveal how toxic site distribution overlays communities of color in L.A.

Jan Perry, current member of the Los Angeles City Council, provides her observations as panel moderator.

Hear the podcast now!

 

 

 

Friday, November 3
Do More
I’m just a [student, staff person, faculty member, homemaker, teenager, dean...], what can I do? More than you think! Come hear stories of people just like you who faced a serious environmental challenge—and met it. The only ones who have ever changed the world answered the call to action with Isaiah’s simple words: “Here am I. Send me!” (Is. 6:8). When you are asked what you did as the time for effective action was passing, what will you say?

 

10-11:50 am
St. Roberts Auditorium
Panel: Don't Mourn. Organize!
In 1985, Dorothy Green learned that barely-treated sewage was being dumped into the Santa Monica Bay. She got angry. She got organized. She founded Heal the Bay. After cleaning up that mess, she made new goals: environmental education in all California schools by 2010 and all Santa Monica Bay beaches get Beach Report Card “A” grades by 2015 are just two of them.

When Andy Lipkis heard that L.A.’s smog was killing the trees in the San Bernardino Mountains, he organized a group of campers to plant smog-tolerant seedlings. He was only 15 years old. Since 1973, TreePeople has inspired Angelinos to take personal responsibility for the urban forest through education, training and support.

Fourteen ecological zones, 1,000 plant species and 400 vertebrate species can be found in Mono Lake’s watershed and surrounding basin. It is one of California’s richest natural areas. Frances Spivey-Weber, executive director of the Mono Lake Committee, is dedicated to protecting and restoring this ecosystem.

If they can do it, so can you.
Hear the podcast now!


7 pm 
St. Roberts Auditorium
Film Screening: "An Inconvenient Truth"
If you haven't seen it, you must. If you have, see it again. This documentary will propel you to do something because it is not a story of despair but a rallying cry to protect the one Earth we all share. Director Davis Guggenheim weaves the science of global warming with Al Gore's personal history and lifelong commitment to reversing the effects of global climate change. A longtime advocate for the environment, Gore presents a wealth of information in a thoughtful and compelling way.

Come to the free screening to find out what the buzz is about. Co-sponsored with Campus Recreation.




OTHER EVENTS DURING THE WEEK


Career Development Services Graduate Studies Fair
Tuesday, Oct. 31
Noon–2 pm
Alumni Mall
Every year CDS hosts a graduate school fair on the LMU campus to connect undergraduate students with different graduate programs at LMU and throughout the United States. Representatives from schools of medicine, law, veterinary, and business will be on campus to share information, answer questions about the application process, school criteria, academic courses, and to distribute brochures and applications.
This year, a directory of graduate programs focusing on environmental studies will be available at the graduate school fair. A wide range of programs are included in the directory including those offering graduate programs in Environmental Science and Engineering, Environmental Education, Natural Resources and Environmental Studies.


Student Poster Presentation
Wednesday, Nov. 1
11 am–12:15 pm          
UHall 4th Floor Atrium (off UHall Bridge)
LMU students will present the results of their research on a variety of environmental topics. The work includes contaminant and ecological studies in the Ballona Wetlands, development of environmental science curricula for the Ballona Discovery Center, and biochemical speciation of bacteria from wetland water samples. The research was done under the guidance of LMU faculty members.


Green Expo &
Non-Profit Organizations Expo
Wednesday, Nov. 1
9 am–4 pm
UHall Atrium
Businesses that feature environmentally-friendly products, processes and/or practices will have booths set up throughout the first floor of University Hall. Learn about companies that “walk the talk” of environmental responsibility and find out more about how they “make money green.” 

Local non-profit organizations that focus on environmental issues, including environmental justice, environmental health, and environmentally responsible practices, will offer information, internships, and insight in a noontime fair that will follow the final session of the forum, “Don’t Mourn. Organize!” Come check out the people and organizations in Los Angeles who are making a difference. We invite you to consider how you can get involved and make a difference too.


Career Development Services Café
Friday, Nov. 3
1–4 pm
UHall Suite 1300
The 2006 Bellarmine Forum is designed to challenge participants to think and act in environmentally responsible ways. Career Development Services has prepared a Directory of Organizations whose missions align with the forum theme. The majority of these organizations offer internships or other types of practical experiences. LMU community members are invited to stop by the CDS suite for light refreshments and to review this directory and other CDS resources focusing on environmental careers. Copies of the directory will be available.


Film Screening: “An Inconvenient Truth”
Friday, Nov. 3
7 pm            
If you haven’t seen it, you must. If you have, see it again. This documentary will propel you to do something because it is not a story of despair but rather a rallying cry to protect the one earth we all share. Director Davis Guggenheim weaves the science of global warming with Al Gore's personal history and lifelong commitment to reversing the effects of global climate change. A longtime advocate for the environment, Gore presents a wealth of information in a thoughtful and compelling way. "Al Gore strips his presentations of politics, laying out the facts for the audience to draw their own conclusions in a charming, funny and engaging style, and by the end has everyone on the edge of their seats, gripped by his haunting message," says Guggenheim. "It is now clear that we face a deepening global climate crisis that requires us to act boldly, quickly and wisely," says Gore. Come to one of the two free showings of “An Inconvenient Truth” (100 min) to find out what the Hollywood buzz is all about.


 
OTHER RELATED EVENTS

Horizon Industries Forum: Green-Industry Jobs in 2016
Tuesday, Oct. 24
8:30–11 am
UHall 1000
What will our economy look like in ten years, and how can we prepare our workforce for the jobs of the future? The economy is already transforming to meet the challenges of environmental conservation with a new wave of "green" industries that overlaps dozens of fields. The boundless variety of jobs in these industries—green manufacturing, energy, architecture, recycling, engineering, landscape design, and many more—will be a major growth sector; but we don't yet know the skills and attributes that will be most desired to fill them.

This forum will bring together senior executives of green companies and other visionaries to evaluate this cutting-edge field and extrapolate how the green industries and their workforce needs will evolve over the next decade. It is also an opportunity to build the partnerships between the academic and business communities that facilitate successful recruitment. Join us for a discussion about the future of jobs, our economy, and our planet.

Interested LMU students, faculty and staff are invited to participate. Please RSVP to LMU’s Career Development Services at careers@lmu.edu or 310.338.2871 no later than October 16, 2006. A confirmation will be sent by the Westside Economic Collaborative prior to the event.

  • Presenter: Westside Economic Collaborative
  • Host: LMU and LMU’s Career Development Services


The Freshman Book
Thursday, Oct. 12
Convo hour: 12:15–1:25 pm
Gersten Pavilion
Every year, the incoming freshman class of Loyola Marymount University is assigned one common book to read during the summer. “Chasing Spring: An American Journey Through a Changing Season” by Bruce Stutz is The Book for 2006.

In “Chasing Spring,” the former editor-in-chief of “Natural History” magazine and author of “Natural Lives, Modern Times: People and Places of the Delaware River” recounts his three-month car journey through the unfolding of an American spring, during which he observes bird migrations, the melting of the Rocky Mountain snow, the blooming of desert wildflowers and a tornado breakout.

Along the way, the author expresses concerns: climate change means that spring is arriving as much as a week earlier across the continent, disrupting migration patterns, and melting glaciers at an alarming speed. Spring remains the season of rebirth, says Stutz—but his report cautions readers to “see it now, because it’s changing.”

In addition to reading the book, LMU’s English Department sponsors this talk and book signing by the author for the freshman class and the entire LMU community.