The LSAT

The LSAT is administered four times a year. Many law schools require that the LSAT be taken by December for admission the following fall. However, taking the test earlier is often advised.

NOTE: Candidates should expect the test day to cover up to seven hours.

 

LSAT DATES:

February 2014 LSAT Dates and Registration Deadlines for Published Test Centers

Test Dates

Saturday, February 8, 2014
Monday, February 10, 2014

Registration Online, by Mail, or by Telephone

January 7, 2014 (receipt deadline)

Late Registration by Mail

January 14, 2014 (receipt deadline)

Late Registration Online or by Telephone

January 17, 2014 (receipt deadline)

 

             June 2014 LSAT Dates and Registration Deadlines for Published Test Centers
Test Date Monday, June 9, 2014
Registration Online, by Mail, or by Telephone May 6, 2014 (receipt deadline)
Late Registration by Mail May 13, 2014 (receipt deadline)
Late Registration Online or by Telephone May 16, 2014 (receipt deadline)

 

          June 2014 LSAT Dates and Registration Deadlines for Nonpublished Test Centers
Test Date Monday, June 9, 2014
Registration May 2, 2014 (receipt deadline)

 

Saturday Sabbath Observers Test Code Center Link: http://www.lsac.org/jd/pdfs/saturdaysabbathtestcentercodes.pdf
Regular Administration Test Code Centers Link:    http://www.lsac.org/jd/pdfs/testcentercodes.pdf 

Note: Walk-ins are not allowed.

NOTE: You may not take the LSAT more than 3 times in any two-year period.

 

FEES:

  • $165 LSAT basic fee
  • $70 late registration fee
  • $36 test center change fee
  • $83 test date change fee
  • $44 hand scoring fee
 

TEST FORMAT:

  • Five 35-minute sections of multiple choice questions
  • Four of these five sections contribute to the overall score. The unscored, or variable, section varies and is used to pretest new questions and new test forms.
  • Lastly, an unscored 35-minute writing sample is administered at the end of each test.

The LSAT is designed to measure skills that are considered essential for success in law school: the reading and comprehension of complex texts with accuracy and insight; the organization and management of information and the ability to draw reasonable inferences from it; the ability to think critically; and the analysis and evaluation of the reasoning and arguments of others.

The three multiple-choice question types in the LSAT are:

  • Reading Comprehension Questions—These questions measure the ability to read, with understanding and insight, examples of lengthy and complex materials similar to those commonly encountered in law school. The Reading Comprehension section contains four sets of reading questions, each consisting of a selection of reading material, followed by five to eight questions that test reading and reasoning abilities.
  • Analytical Reasoning Questions—These questions measure the ability to understand a structure of relationships and to draw logical conclusions about that structure. You are asked to reason deductively from a set of statements and rules or principles that describe relationships among persons, things, or events. Analytical Reasoning questions reflect the kinds of complex analyses that a law student performs in the course of legal problem solving.
  • Logical Reasoning Questions—These questions assess the ability to analyze, critically evaluate, and complete arguments as they occur in ordinary language. Each Logical Reasoning question requires the test taker to read and comprehend a short passage, then answer a question about it. The questions are designed to assess a wide range of skills involved in thinking critically, with an emphasis on skills that are central to legal reasoning. These skills include drawing well-supported conclusions, reasoning by analogy, determining how additional evidence affects an argument, applying principles or rules, and identifying argument flaws.

 

This link: http://www.lsac.org/jd/lsat/lsat-prep-materials.asp has free  sample questions with explanations along with the 2007 LSAT.

This link: https://os.lsac.org/RELEASE/Shop/Publications.aspx has the official LSAC LSAT preparation books.

 

LSAT SCORE:

If you choose to receive your LSAT score by e-mail, you will receive it approximately three weeks after you take the test. This is the quickest way to receive your score with no additional charge.

If you choose to receive your LSAT score by mail, it will take approximately four weeks after you take the test.

You are also able to cancel your LSAT scores by sending a written cancelation request to LSAC within 6 calendar days of taking you test.

Click here for information about UNDERSTANDING YOUR SCORE.