Taking on Reproductive Justice

I was recently given the opportunity to attend a lecture given by Dr. Hille Haker of Loyola University Chicago, “Feminist Bioethics and the Concept of Parenthood in the Age of Reproduction.” I’ve always been a big proponent of reproductive rights for women and men, but I never knew that the subject extended beyond the availability and quality of abortion, contraceptives and reproductive care. Dr. Haker discussed at length the ethics and morality of assisted reproduction – all the nooks and crannies of reproductive justice that are often hidden away from public discourse.

Did you know an egg donor can make between $5,000 and $10,000 for an embryo egg “donation?” Young women, particularly those struggling to pay college bills, are scouted for in magazines and newspapers to donate their eggs or be surrogate mothers.

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Bioethics Requires Respect for Human Dignity, Professor Argues

By Matthew Archbold
The National Catholic Register reviewed the book A Defense of Dignity by philosophy professor Chris Kaczor of Loyola Marymount University.

The National Catholic Register reviewed the book A Defense of Dignity by philosophy professor Chris Kaczor of Loyola Marymount University, who previously served as a research fellow for The Cardinal Newman Society’s Center for the Advancement of Catholic Higher Education: As a term used to justify diametrically opposed courses of action, “dignity” is a term that many doubt is of practical use in ethical discussions.  

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In Jahi McMath Saga, Science and Religion Clash

In Jahi McMath Saga, Science and Religion Clash

by Sandy Banks
January 3, 2014

Families of brain-dead patients need compassion and understanding, not lawyers or PR consultants.

Dr. Richard Boudreau, Affiliate Faculty member of The Bioethics Institute, is quoted in this article.

Read the entire article here.

Dr. Richard Boudreau responded with a letter to the editor (below).

Letters: Jahi McMath and Medical Futility by Richard Boudreau, MD, Affiliate Faculty Member

Re: "Girl's ventilator court order extended," Dec. 31

The concept of medical futility can simply be stated in regard to an essential fact of human life: At some time in every life, disability or death will exceed our medical powers.

Read the article here.

Medical Error Disclosure: Is it Safe to Say You're Sorry?

By Richard Boudreau, MA, MBA, DDS, MD, JD, PhD

Affiliate Faculty, The Bioethics Institute, LMU

In The Compass, Summer 2012

With respect to error, the practice of medicine/dentistry is a business no different from any other industry; when mistakes are made by an operator, they are both acknowledged and rectified. Most times an apology accompanies the correction, such as with an overcharge at a retail store or an incomplete repair at the mechanic. However, when a health care practitioner makes an error, the corrective measure is not as simple as a refund or redoing the procedural rather, mistakes are not readily accounted for and even hidden with the hopes no one will find out.

Read the entire article here.

Treating an Expanding Population and Medical Malpractice: A Doctor's Point of View

By Richard Boudreau, MA, MBA, DDS, MD, JD, PhD

Affiliate Faculty, The Bioethics Institute, LMU

One of the inevitable consequences of Obama's Affordable Care Act is that millions of Americans who did not have access to health care in the past may be seeking care, and physicians and medical facilities will have to address the needs of growing patient populations. From a physician standpoint, this growing population poses a number of issues, including care management, increasing workforce needs, increasing costs, and the potential for an increased number of malpractice lawsuits. This last issue, the problem of medical malpractice and the increase in the cost of malpractice insurance, has many physicians debating the viability of their practices in light of expanding costs. 

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POLST v. DNAR End of Life

By Richard Boudreau, MA, MBA, DDS, MD, JD, PhD

The Compass, Summer 2011

The fact is, we are all mortal beings and despite our best efforts, we're all going to face end of life issues, whether our own, or our immediate family member's. Most are familiar with a standard DNAR form (do not attempt resuscitation) in a patient's chart; however, they fall short. The POLST form (physician orders for life-sustaining treatment) translates advance directives into a physician's order that can be followed when a patient is too sick to speak for themselves. Many patients discuss their code status with their doctor and a "Do Not Attempt Resuscitation" (DNAR) is marked on their chart; however, a missed DNAR chart note is all it takes to start an unwanted journey.

Read the article here.